Shliakhetstvo

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shliakhetstvo

 

a term borrowed from Polish (szlachectwo) and used in 18th-century Russia to designate the nobility. The adjectival derivatives are shliakhetnyi and shliakhetskii.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fediukin, "'Ot oboikh istinnoe shliakhetstvo': Sukhoputnyi shliakhetnyi kadetskii korpus i konstruirovaniie poslepetrovskoi elity, 1731-1762," in Ideal vospitaniia dvorianstva v Evrope (17-nachalo 19 vv.), ed.
[16] Prelates from the nobility predominated because of the large influx of Ukrainian, Polish, and White Russian graduates of Kiev Academy, many of whom belonged to the Polish shliakhetstvo.
Arguably the most theoretically sophisticated contributions to the volume, the articles by Dmitrii Polonskii, Nikolai Petrukhintsev, Mikhail Kiselev, and Sergei Pol'skoi return to questions of terminology, with reference to epistolary etiquette and self-identification, the language of soslovie, the distinction between magnates or lineal nobles (famil'nye) and lesser service nobles (the shliakhetstvo) during the political crisis of 1730, and the formation and political significance of "court society" (pridvornoe obshchestvo) in the post-Petrine era.