shock absorber

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shock absorber,

device for reducing the effect of a sudden shock by the dissipation of the shock's energy. On an automobile, springs and shock absorbers are mounted between the wheels and the frame. When the wheels hit a hole or a raised spot on a road, the springs absorb the resultant shock by expanding and contracting. To prevent the springs from shaking the frame excessively, their motion is restrained by shock absorbers, which are also known by the more descriptive term dampers. The type of shock absorber found on automobiles is usually a hydraulic type that has a casing consisting of two tubes, one telescoping into the other. In order for a spring to expand and contract, it must pull apart and push together the ends of this shock absorber. But the ends offer so much resistance that the motion of the spring quickly dies out. The ends are connected to a piston in an oil-filled chamber in the shock absorber's inner tube. The piston can only move if it forces oil past it through valves. This arrangement creates a large resistance to any motion by the piston and consequently by the ends. On some automobiles a type of hydraulic suspension is used to function both as a spring and as a shock absorber. It comprises a sealed spherical container filled with equal volumes of hydraulic fluid and gas under pressure. The compression of the gas, which absorbs the shock, is supplied by the vehicle's engine. Shock absorbers are used on aircraft to ease the impact upon landing. Some machines are mounted on resilient materials composed, e.g., of cork or rubber. The materials act as shock absorbers, isolating the vibrations of the machine from the surrounding area.
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shock absorber

[′shäk əb‚zȯr·bər]
(mechanical engineering)
A spring, a dashpot, or a combination of the two, arranged to minimize the acceleration of the mass of a mechanism or portion thereof with respect to its frame or support.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shock absorber

A device built into the landing gear of an aircraft to absorb the shock that occurs when the aircraft touches down on landing and during a ground roll to decrease shock in the airframe. The most common form of shock absorber is an oleo (oil and gas) strut. See oleo leg.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

shock absorber

any device designed to absorb mechanical shock, esp one fitted to a motor vehicle to damp the recoil of the suspension springs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005