Shogunate


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Shogunate

 

the government of the shoguns in feudal Japan from 1192 to 1867. The term is used in the literature along with the Japanese name Bakufu. The shogunate was a political form of dictatorship by the feudal lords. The feudal princes needed a strong authority to crush peasant movements and, in the late Middle Ages, to combat the rising bourgeoisie. At the same time, the shogunate, usually headed by a representative of the most important feudal house of the day (Minamoto, Ashikaga, or Tokugawa), exercised control over other principalities by force of economic superiority. Under the shogunate, the administrative apparatus was in the hands of the military class (bushi, or samurai), and there was no clear division between legislative and executive power or between administrative and military bodies.

References in periodicals archive ?
Military training became less practical and more ritualised and although many pursued careers in their respective shogunates as administrators, officials and scholars, the under-employed warriors entered a period of decadence.
The first elaborates on the Dutch transformation into loyal Tokugawa retainers, the second traces the process by which the shogunate curtailed VOC maritime violence, and the third examines how the company begrudgingly abrogated its own self-proclaimed sovereignty.
The remarkably long survival of the Kano was primarily owing to their status as official painters-in-attendance to the Tokugawa shogunate. With the overthrow of the shogunate the patronage base of the Kano collapsed and their studios and property, including their lands, were confiscated by the new government.
Bunchi, Cogan argues, was able to differentiate her ascetic practice from Isshi's because she was a member of the sovereign's family and utilized the resources and connections with the court, as well as with the shogunate.
The "Dutch" designation was a consequence of the so-called sakoku [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (closed-country) restrictions that the early Tokugawa shogunate placed on Japanese interactions with Westerners.
The Ginseng trade, for example, was extremely important in Japan, but to maintain it, the shogunate was forced to mint special coins that were of a higher precious metal content than other coins circulating throughout the country.
Tracing a long history of Shogunate Japan through its many periods to the earliest shoguns to the fall of the Tokugawa Shogunate and the many major figures who changed the face of Japanese history, it accompanies plenty of information to be studied and applied with no shortage of woodcut reproductions.
In Japan, futures trading for rice started in 1730 at Dojima, Osaka, with the Tokugawa shogunate's approval.
Kan gave his Cabinet this nickname upon his inauguration--Kiheitai refers to the first Western-style volunteer militia in Japan, which comprised members of various social classes and fought against the ruling Tokugawa shogunate in the mid-19th century.
President Abraham Lincoln to Tokugawa Iemochi, the 14th shogun of the Tokugawa Shogunate, said Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Tetsuro Fukuyama.
The Edo era's Tokugawa Shogunate imposed anti-Christian edicts in the early 17th century, oppressing Christians and banishing European priests.
Ekiken a prolific author lived during the Takugawa Shogunate an extraordinary era of peace in Japanese history where feudal samurai had to adjust to a world without constant warfare.