Hamada

(redirected from Shoji Hamada)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Hamada

(hämä`dä), city (1990 pop. 49,135), Shimane prefecture, SW Honshu, Japan, on the Japan Sea. It is a fishing and commercial port.

hamada

[hə′mä·də]
(geology)
A barren desert surface composed of consolidated material usually consisting of exposed bedrock, but sometimes of consolidated sedimentary material.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
1,000-PS2,000 In the Twenties he developed a relationship with Shoji Hamada, who visited his London pottery, resulting in Murray's increased interest in early Chinese ceramics.
Shoji Hamada made this bowl (above) at Leach's St Ives studio; this bulbous Rie vase (right) sold for pounds 1,400 in a sale in March This David Leach vase is impressed with the DL monogram to one side and is worth pounds 200-pounds 300
Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada were influential people in the field, disseminating the value of functional pottery in everyday life.
Included are works from Dartington Hall Trust Collection, among them works by Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada, who established the Leach Pottery in the early 1920s -- a significant fusion of ceramics from the East and West.
It consists of forty-eight short essays, poems, process suggestions and philosophical statements interspersed with delightful and insightful quotes about clay by the likes of John Updike, Herbert Read, John Ruskin and Shoji Hamada.
There are many ceramics traditions in Japan, from finely decorated porcelain, which has been imported into the west since the 1600s, to the more sober folk art brought to the West's attention by Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada in the early 20th centry, to the modern Wester-influenced contemporary scene.
During the months to come, I would learn who Warren Mackenzie is and who Shoji Hamada was, what 'cone 10' means and how to pronounce 'NCECA'.
Imagine: The legend Shoji Hamada was there, proof of those rare moments when the beauty of crafts (think Anni Albers) supersedes the pretensions to art made by painters or sculptors.
The collection covers British ceramic art from pioneer potters such as Bernard Leach, Shoji Hamada and Michael Cardew, through to works made by the current generation of artists.
David was born in Tokyo in 1911, and was taught to pot by Shoji Hamada.
It was here they met Shoji Hamada, a Japanese potter working with Leach in St Ives, whose work ranks alongside Leach himself.