messenger

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messenger

1. a carrier of official dispatches; courier
2. Nautical
a. a light line used to haul in a heavy rope
b. an endless belt of chain, rope, or cable, used on a powered winch to take off power
3. Archaic a herald

MESSENGER

abbrev. for Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging, a NASA mission to the planet Mercury, launched Aug. 3 2004 from Cape Canaveral by a Delta 2 Heavy rocket and forming part of the agency's Discovery Program. Although an acronym, the name recalls the planet's mythical association with Mercury the winged messenger of the gods. The MESSENGER spacecraft is NASA's first Mercury orbiter. Its chief goal is to investigate important scientific questions about Mercury's surface and interior composition and its environment. Among other things, the probe will seek to find out why Mercury's density is so high, what the composition and structure of its crust is, and whether there has been any volcanism. It will also look into the nature, dynamics and origin of Mercury's magnetic field (possibly driven by a liquid outer core) and its tenuous atmosphere. One focus of interest will be the mysterious polar deposits on Mercury, which some scientists believe could be water ice. The data for these questions will be gathered by an array of seven miniature instruments working in one of the most hostile environments in the Solar System, a mere 58 million km from the Sun.

To avoid overshooting its target and possibly falling into the Sun, the MESSENGER craft is following a 6½-year, 7.9-billion-km roundabout course to Mercury that should slow it down sufficiently to accomplish its task. The journey will involve 15 solar orbits, 6 trajectory-altering planetary flybys (including 1 of the Earth, 2 of Venus, and 3 of Mercury itself), and 6 crucial rocket firings. It will enter orbit around Mercury in March 2011 for a year of scientific data collection.

messenger

[′mes·ən·jər]
(engineering)
A small, cylindrical metal weight that is attached around an oceanographic wire and sent down to activate the tripping mechanism on various oceanographic devices.
(naval architecture)
A light line used to haul in a larger line or hawser.

Messenger

Aethalides
herald of the Argonauts. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 11]
Alden, John
(1599–1687) speaks to Priscilla Mullins for Miles Standish. [Am. Lit.: “The Courtship of Miles Standish” in Hart, 188–189]
caduceus
Mercury’s staff; symbol of messengers. [Rom. Myth.: Jobes, 266–267]
dove
sent by Noah to see if the waters were abated; returns with an olive leaf. [O.T.: Genesis 8:8–11]
eagle
symbolic carrier of God’s word to all. [Christian Symbol-ism: Appleton, 35]
Gabriel
announces births of Jesus and John the Baptist. [N.T.: Luke 1:19, 26]
Hermes
(Rom. Mercury) messenger of the gods. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler Dictionary, 240]
Iris
messenger of the gods. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 130; Gk. Lit.: Iliad]
Irus
real name was Arnaeus; messenger of Penelope’s suitors. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]
Munin and Hugin
Odin’s two ravens; brought him news from around world. [Norse Myth.: Leach, 761]
Nasby
nickname for U.S. postmasters. [Am. Usage: Brewer Dictionary, 745–746]
Pheidippides
ran 26 miles from Marathon to Athens to carry news of Greek defeat of Persians. [Gk. Legend: Zimmerman, 159]
Pony Express
speedy relay mail-carrying system of 1860s. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 276]
Reuters
news agency; established as telegraphic and pigeon post bureau (1851). [Br. Hist.: Benét, 852]
Revere, Paul
(1735–1818) warned colonials of British advance (1775). [Am. Hist.: 425–426]
staff
symbolic of a courier on a mission. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 4]
Stickles, Jeremy
messenger for the king of England (1880s). [Br. Lit.: Lorna Doone, Magill I, 524–526]
Strogoff, Michael
courier of the czar. [Fr. Lit.: Michael Strogoff]
thorn
the messenger of Satan. [N.T.: II Corinthians 12:7]
Western Union
company founded in 1851; provides telegraphic service in U.S. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2958]

AIM

(1) (AOL Instant Messenger) America Online's instant messaging service, which supports text chat, photo sharing, online gaming and PC to PC voice. An AIM list of Instant Messenger contacts is called a "Buddy List." AIM was part of America Online and then a stand-alone service in 1997. It was discontinued at the end of 2017. See instant messaging.

(2) (Application Integration Middleware) An umbrella term for middleware software that ties applications together. See application integration, middleware and PPMW.

(3) (Association for Automatic Identification and Mobility, Warrendale, PA, www.aimglobal.org) The trade association for the automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) industry. Established in 1982 as a product division of the Material Handling Institute (MHI), AIM is involved in setting standards for barcodes, magnetic stripes and RFID technology. See also AIIM.

(4) (Apple IBM Motorola) The alliance of Apple, IBM and Motorola that developed the PowerPC chip. See PowerPC and Apple-IBM alliance.

Facebook Messenger

Facebook's instant messaging service, which is available on the Facebook website and as an app for mobile devices. Introduced in 2011, and initially bundled into the Facebook mobile apps, instant messaging was separated into the stand-alone Messenger app in 2014. In addition, iPhone and Android users can use Messenger as their primary text messaging client (SMS) and not have to switch between apps for messages from non-Messenger users.

As of 2019, Facebook Messenger and Facebook's WhatsApp instant messaging exist as separate services, each with more than a billion users. See Chat Head, WhatsApp Messenger, Facebook M and Facebook.

Messenger Kids With Parental Controls
In 2017, Messenger Kids was introduced for children under the age of 13. Parents have to authorize its use and are in control of whom their children can text and chat with. Digital stickers and animated masks let kids create fun photos and videos.

Google Talk

Google's instant messaging (IM) service, introduced in 2005. Google Talk provided text messaging and voice calling for Windows, Android, BlackBerry and Chrome OS devices. Based on the XMPP/Jabber protocol (see Jabber), Google Talk provided a link to the user's Gmail account and displayed the number of unread messages in the inbox. It was also a component of the Google Apps package (see G Suite). In 2015, the Google Talk client programs were discontinued although third-party apps that use the XMPP protocol are still supported.

messaging system

A messaging system sends text messages from one user to one or more other users. Image attachments are also typically supported. This definition covers the components of an Internet-based email system. For text and instant messaging, see text messaging and instant messaging.

Mail User Agent (Client)
The mail user agent (MUA or UA) is the client email program, such as Outlook, Eudora or Mac Mail, which is used to compose, send and receive messages.

Message Transfer Agent (Server)
The message transfer agent (MTA), or "mail transfer agent," is a mail server that forwards messages from user agents (MUAs) or delivers mail to its own message store (MS) for local recipients. Sendmail and Microsoft Exchange are the most widely used MTAs, and in a large enterprise, there may be several MTAs deployed.

Message Store
The message store (MS) holds the mail until it is selectively retrieved and deleted by an access server. A local delivery agent (LDA) writes the messages from the MTA to the message store, and the protocols used to retrieve the mail are POP and IMAP (see POP3 and IMAP4).

The Internet's SMTP
Internet email is based on the SMTP protocol. Prior to the Internet's enormous growth in the late 1990s, numerous proprietary messaging systems were widely used, including cc:Mail, Microsoft Mail, PROFS and DISOSS. See SMTP, messaging middleware, text messaging and instant messaging.

WhatsApp Messenger

An ad-free instant messaging service for all major smartphones from WhatsApp Inc., wholly owned by Facebook. Founded in 2009 by Brian Acton and Jan Koum, WhatsApp uses the Internet as an alternative to the SMS text messaging system. Via Wi-Fi, subscribers pay nothing for WhatsApp messages the first year and 99 cents per year thereafter. If Wi-Fi is unavailable, and people use their cellular data plans for WhatsApp messages, thousands can be sent for a fraction of total usage because text takes up very few bytes (characters).

WhatsApp also provides voice calling from one WhatsApp user to the other, as well as voice recording, which lets users record and send audio messages instead of typing.

With more than 400 million monthly users worldwide and billions of messages sent each day, Facebook acquired the company for USD $19 billion in 2014. See SMS and Facebook Messenger.

Windows Live Messenger

Microsoft's earlier instant messaging (IM) service, which provided text messaging, file sharing, and voice and video calling. Launched in 1999 as MSN Messenger, in 2005, MSN Messenger and Windows Messenger (the IM in Windows XP) were combined into one system under the Windows Live umbrella. Users could instant message with each other as well as Yahoo! Messenger users. In 2013, Messenger merged into Microsoft's Skype video calling service. See MSN, MSN Messenger and Windows Live.

Yahoo Messenger

Yahoo's instant messaging (IM) service, which includes text messaging, voice calling and file sharing. The IM client includes Internet radio and the regular phone calling at rates as low as one cent per minute. Starting with Version 8.1, Yahoo Messenger and Windows Live Messenger users can instant message each other. See instant messaging, voice chat and Yahoo.

Yahoo! Messenger

Yahoo!'s instant messaging (IM) service, which includes text messaging, voice calling and file sharing. Introduced in 1998 as Yahoo! Pager and renamed Yahoo! Messenger in 1999, it was discontinued in 2018. The IM client included Internet radio and the regular phone calling at rates as low as one cent per minute. Starting with Version 8.1, Yahoo! Messenger and Windows Live Messenger users could instant message each other. See instant messaging, voice chat and Yahoo!.
References in periodicals archive ?
Can't they see that all they are doing is falling into the biggest trap in sporting history of shooting the messenger?
Keep blaming the media for every single thing that goes wrong in your life if you want to but sooner or later you'll begin to realise you're only shooting the messenger.
Not so much shooting the messenger as shooting the wrong messenger - particularly when the abused title is expressly pro-Reid.
It said: "In arresting these two journalists the police are engaging in shooting the messenger."
GRANADA TV chiefs last night dismissed Michael Jackson's threat to release a video of Martin Bashir as "the most expensive, clumsy and desperate attempt at shooting the messenger we've ever seen".
Sian could easily turn on him - a matter of ignoring the message and shooting the messenger. Not everyone welcomes sad tidings.
He also needs to chill out a bit - being tetchy with the media is like shooting the messenger.
Americans who think Washington is out of control should look on the bright side: You could live in Europe, where the political class is confronting its sovereign debt crisis by shooting the messengers and imposing new taxes on an almost daily basis.
We, on the other hand, prefer to see policemen and women on our streets (if cameras are so good at preventing crime how come it is also claimed they catch so many people committing crimes in full view of them?) If only Mr Brunstrom would concentrate on making our streets safe - and stop always shooting the messengers...
This is a classic case of shooting the messengers as the councillors have been long campaigning for action to be taken to reform the social services system.