Shorten


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Shorten

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References in classic literature ?
Day by day, hole by hole, our bearing reins were shortened, and instead of looking forward with pleasure to having my harness put on, as I used to do, I began to dread it.
Anne and Leslie had another cry the next week when they shortened Little Jem.
So we shortened up one of the calico gowns, and I turned up my trouser-legs to my knees and got into it.
Roads will everywhere be shortened, and kept in better order; accommodations for travelers will be multiplied and meliorated; an interior navigation on our eastern side will be opened throughout, or nearly throughout, the whole extent of the thirteen States.
For a time that scared me; but any concession would have shortened our chance of escape beyond estimating.
When cells divide the telomeres, or the (https://www.tasciences.com/what-is-a-telomere/) protective caps on the end of our chromosomes , shorten. As we age, our cells divide more and as a result the telomeres further shorten.
So, you will need to shorten the distance between your release hand and the string itself.
Authors Corless, King, Shorten, and Wirth present readers with a comprehensive examination of the AIMD algorithm, the most widely used method of allocating limited resources amongst competing agents without centralized control.
In a study using zebrafish, which have human-like telomeres, a team of Portuguese scientists led by Miguel Godinho Ferreira, PhD, of the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, Portugal, found that over time telomeres shorten to critical lengths only in specific tissues, and independent of their proliferation (growth) rate.
"Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures located at the ends of chromosomes which shorten with repetitive cell division and replication," explained Elizabeth Hoge, MD, a psychiatrist and investigator in MGH's Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders.
"Each time a cell reproduces, its telomeres shorten a little bit, until the telomeres become so short that the cell can no longer reproduce," explains researcher Mary Armanios of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.
The findings are based on a study of telomeres, protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that shorten as we age.