Shrewishness


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Related to Shrewishness: undeterred, stirred up, overhyped

Shrewishness

See also Irascibility.
Shyness (See TIMIDITY.)
Similarity (See TWINS.)
Sinfulness (See WICKEDNESS.)
Caudle, Mrs. Margaret
nagging, complaining wife. [Br. Lit.: The Curtain Lectures, Walsh Modem, 90]
Dollallolla, Queen
even King Arthur feared his uxorial virago. [Br. Lit: Tom Thumb the Great]
farmer’s wife
makes hell too hot even for the devil, who sends her back home. [Am. Balladry: “The Devil and the Farmer’s Wife”]
Frome, Zenobia (Zeena)
Ethan Frome’s hypochondriacal, nag ging, belittling wife. [Am. Lit.: Ethan Frome]
Galatea
19th-century version: nags Pygmalion. [Aust. Operetta: von Suppé, Beautiful Galatea, Westerman, 285]
Gargery, Mrs.
vixenish wife; keeps husband in thrall. [Br. Lit.: Great Expectations]
Katherine
“intolerably curst and shrewd and froward.” [Br. Lit.: The Taming of the Shrew]
Lisa, Dame
Jurgen’s petulant wife taken from him in gratitude by the Prince of Darkness. [Am. Lit.: Jurgen in Magill I, 464]
MacStinger, Mrs.
widow; miserable to everyone. [Br. Lit.: Dombey and Son]
Momus
personification of censoriousness, constantly carping, grumbling, and finding fault. [Gk. Myth.: EB (1963) XV, 685]
Peninnah
continually harassed co-wife Hannah about her barrenness. [O. T.: I Samuel 1:6]
Proudie, Mrs.
aggressive, domineering wife of Bishop Proudie. [Br. Lit.: Trollope Barchester Towers in Magill I, 55]
Sofronia
Norina, disguised for mock marriage, pretends to be virago. [Ital. Opera: Donizetti, Don Pasquale, Westerman, 123–124]
Tabitha
Mr. Bramble’s virago sister; bent on matrimony. [Br. Lit.: Humphry Clinker]
Termagant
tumultuous Muslim deity (male); today, a virago. [Medieval Lit.: Espy, 125]
Xanthippe
Socrates’ peevish, quarrelsome wife. [Gk. Hist.: Espy, 114]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Kate's shrewishness is tamed in Shakespeare's play, Catarina's struggle for genuine agency leads her to a more active and autonomous societal position.
(30) Schneider insightfully notes that "there is a paradox in that when women transgress bonds associated with the private (adultery, husband scolding, or shrewishness), they are punished by being exposed to public humiliation; they are not shoved more deeply into the private, but carted, cucked, bridled.
The sterile hags are associated repeatedly with noise: discordant music, chanting, gossip, emasculating shrewishness that both reflects and creates an image of female sexuality as unruly; similarly, the shrill gossips of Epicoene are the bane of their comic target, Morose, a recluse with a pathological hatred of noise whose bride has been offered to him solely on the basis of her supposed modesty and silence.
Petruchio is altered both by Kate's witty shrewishness and his desire for her from the moment he hears of her.
Famously, Bogdanov's Shrew began in the audience, set up "shrewishness" ("No damned woman's going to tell me what to do") as potentially threatening to manhood, forced the eye to travel, with Jonathan Pryce's Petruchiosurrogate, from the stalls to the stage where, wiping away an Italianate theatrical past, play and players were fused to contemporary socio-sexual territories.
(32) As Robertson describes her entrance, however, it becomes clear that this Kate was no placid contessa: Not a whit of her shrewishness did she spare us; her storms of passion found vent in snarls, growls, and even inarticulate screams of fury; she paced hither and thither liked a caged wild beast, but her rages were magnificent like an angry sea or a sky of tempest, she blazed a fiery comet through the play, baleful but beautiful.
They were processions 'accompanied by cacophonous drumming and music, with one or more men, sometimes costumed (frequently as women), and either walking, riding a horse (usually backwards or facing each other if there were two riders), sitting astride a pole, or being carried in a cart.' (10) Communities sometimes used skimmingtons as a form of community justice through public humiliation for adultery or shrewishness, but they also used them for social and political purposes as well.
As other interpreters have noted, (25) Shakespeare's audience would understand her unbridled speech as "shrewishness"; in order for Petruchio to prove to an early modern audience that he has tamed Katherina, he must silence her.
(55) Tempting as it may be to see in Hamlet's critique of Termagant an invective against theatrical shrewishness of the kind purveyed by Katherine, the character's associations were in Shakespeare's day still exclusively male and pagan.
10 Things strongly links this shrewishness with Kat's feminism, which the movie portrays as an embodiment of the media stereotype of the "feminazi." (7) This caricature resembles the overall description assembled by Paula Kamen, who asked over a thousand members of the "twentysomething" generation what they associate with the term "feminist." They answered, with some variations,
The nearest the canonical Shakespeare ever comes to using the word is in the opening scene of Much Ado, where Benedick jokily refers to Beatrice's shrewishness "so some gentleman or other shall escape a predestinate scratched face" (1.1.123-5).
At the same time, McKenna and Abbey were tracing a psychologically realistic trajectory that attributed Katherina's shrewishness to familial rejection and disappointed social aspirations.