Shuia

Shuia

 

a city under oblast jurisdiction and the administrative center of Shuia Raion, Ivanovo Oblast, RSFSR. Landing on the Teza River, a tributary of the Kliaz’ma; railroad station on the Novki-Ivanovo line. Population, 72,000 (1977; 58,000 in 1939).

Shuia is first mentioned in historical documents in the year 1539. In the 16th and 17th centuries it traded with cities along the Volga and was known for the production of sheepskin, leather, linen, and felted fabric and the manufacture of such goods as sleighs and wagons. In the 18th century the textile industry began to develop in the city, and the first factory was built circa 1755. In 1778, Shuia became the capital of a district in Vladimir Viceger-ency (from 1796, Vladimir Province). The first cotton mill was built in the city in 1838, and as of 1850 the city had 17 weaving mills with 5,122 workers.

In 1903, F. A. Afanas’ev formed the first Social Democratic circle in Shuia. During the Revolution of 1905–07, M. V. Frunze carried on propaganda among the textile workers of the city. In September 1917 he was elected chairman of the district soviet of workers’ and peasants’ deputies; under his leadership the workers of Shuia took part in the October Armed Uprising in Moscow. In 1918, Shuia became the capital of a district in Ivanovo-Voznesensk Province, and in 1932 it became the administrative center of a raion in Ivanovo Oblast.

Shuia has three textile mills, an accordion factory, a furniture factory, a felted-fabric factory, a drawn-thread embroidery workshop, a garment factory, and a knitwear factory. The city also has a machine-building plant, a chemical fibers plant, an oil extraction plant, and a plant for the manufacture of rolled metal products. Educational institutions include a pedagogical institute, an industrial technicum, and a medical school. The M. V. Frunze Memorial Museum and a museum of local lore are located in the city.

REFERENCE

Ryzhov, V. Gorod Shuia i Shuiskii okrug: Geograficheskoe, istoricheskoe i ekonomicheskoe opisanie. Shuia, 1930.

Shuia

 

an urban-type settlement in Onega Raion, Karelian ASSR. Shuia is located 4 km from the Shuiskaia railroad station on the Petrozavodsk-Murmansk line. The settlement has a sovkhoz specializing in meat and dairy farming.


Shuia

 

(also Suoioki), a river in the Karelian ASSR. The Shuia has a length of 194 km and drains an area of 10,100 sq km. It issues from the lake Suoiarvi (area, 58.5 sq km) and flows through several small lakes and the lake Shotozero (area, 74 sq km) before emptying into the lake Logmozero (16 sq km), which is linked with Lake Onega by a channel 0.8 km long. Lakes occupy 10.6 percent of the Shuia’s length. The mean flow rate 11 km from the river’s mouth is 90.2 cu m per sec. The Shuia freezes over between November and January, and the ice breaks up in April or the first half of May. The river’s flow is regulated at the mouth. The Shuia is used for floating timber.


Shuia

 

a river in Kostroma Oblast, RSFSR; a left tributary of the Nemda River of the Volga River basin. The Shuia originates on the Galich Rise. The river is fed by mixed sources, but mainly by snow. High water occurs in April and May; there are freshets in the summer and autumn. The mean flow rate 25 km from the river’s mouth is approximately 11 cu m per sec. The Shuia freezes over in November, and the ice breaks up in April. The river is used for floating timber.

References in periodicals archive ?
Their estates were located within the larger geographical framework between local district towns of Kovrov and Shuia in Vladimir Province, an area poorly suited for agriculture.
Dobrotvorskii attributed the prevalence of `unprintable songs and sayings' in the village of Shuia to the influence of work in the textile mills of the region.
One such document is Lenin's notorious top secret letter to Molotov of 19 March 1922, following the bloody incident at the industrial town of Shuia, where a sizable crowd of believers had tried to prevent an armed confiscation brigade from entering the church.
Then he ordered Party officials to arrest in Shuia "as many people as possible .
51) Vorob'ev, as usual, rummaged up the intriguing detail that in Shuia uezd in the late 1890s, 48.