Sibbaldia

Sibbaldia

 

a genus of plants of the family Rosaceae. The plants are spreading, strongly branched perennial herbs with woody shoots bearing rosettes of temate petiolate leaves and short (1–5 cm tall) flower-bearing stems. The pentamerous flowers are in dense few-flowered cymose inflorescences. The fruit is a multiple nutlet consisting of five to 15 nutlets. There are about ten species (according to other data, as many as 20), distributed in the arctic zone and in the mountains of the temperate zone of Eurasia and North America. The USSR has four or five species. S. procumbens, which is found in the arctic and on bald peaks in Eastern Siberia and the Far East, forms a thick cover on damp, gravelly slopes and placers and near rivers. In the tundra the plant serves as forage for reindeer in the spring and summer. S. parviflora, which grows in the Caucasus, is characteristic of alpine plant cover; it is valuable pasturage for sheep.

References in periodicals archive ?
Vahl Sibbaldia tridentata (Solander) Paule & Sojak Sorbus groenlandica (Schneider) A.
1800 2500 -- Selaginella selaginoides (L.) 2200 2800 Link EN Sibbaldia procumbens L.
cusickii, or both, 2.7%), mountain laurel (Kalmia polifolia, 2.5%), sibbaldia (Sibbaldia procumbens, 2.4%), and alpine pussytoes (Antennaria media, 2.3%).
In the Pamirs, Sibbaldia decumbens (Rosaceae) forms large cushions of up to 600 different individuals that, as an additional adaptation to an extremely dry climate, can store up to five or six times their own weight of water.
The plant assemblage of these moist, but well-drained, meadows is characterized by glacier lilies, smooth woodrush (Luzula hitchcockii), sedges (Carex spp.), creeping sibbaldia (Sibbaldia procumbens), and western St.
Aster laevis Sibbaldia procumbens Senecio triangularis Epilobium alpinum Hypericum formosum
There are a few sheltered herb slopes with low arctic species such as Botrychium lunaria, Thalictrum alpinum, Sibbaldia procumbens, Gentiana tenella, and Taraxacum brachyceras.
Such time lags may explain, in part, why snow accumulation associated with road construction in Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado) enhanced the abundances of generalist alpine species (Geum rossii and Artemisia scopulorum) rather than snowbed specialists (e.g., Ranunculus adoneus, Sibbaldia procumbens; Bell and Bliss 1979).
We compare the responses of six coexisting alpine plant species, Artemisia scopulorum (Asteraceae), Geum rossii and Sibbaldia procumbens (Rosaceae), Trifolium parryi (Fabaceae), Ranunculus adoneus (Ranunculaceae), and Poa alpina (Poaceae) to an environmental factor that varies dramatically along latitudinal, elevational, and emergence gradients: growing-season length.
For this study we monitored abundances of the six most common species: Ranunculus adoneus, Sibbaldia procumbens, Geum rossii (synonymous with Acomostylis rossii), Trifolium parryi, Artemisia scopulorum, and Poa alpina.
Biological flora of the British Isles: Sibbaldia procumbens L.