Sicarii


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Sicarii

 

members of the radical wing of the Zealots, a religious and political group in the Roman province of Judea (first century A.D.). Expressing the interests of the most downtrodden social strata, the Sicarii were implacable opponents of Roman rule and of oppression by their own propertied classes. The Sicarii destroyed debt documents en masse, freed slaves, and called on the freed slaves to join their ranks. The leaders of the Sicarii were Menahem, son of the Zealot leader Judah the Galilean, Eleazar ben Jair, and Simeon bar Giora. In A.D. 66, early in the Jewish War of 66–73, the Sicarii captured the fortress of Masada and held it until A.D. 73. Some groups of the Sicarii fled to Egypt and Cyrene, where they also led a struggle against Rome.

REFERENCE

Amusin, I. D. “Zhrebii poslednikh zashchitnikov Masady.” Voprosy Istorii, 1965, no. 8.
References in periodicals archive ?
Queen Berenice of Judaea, the mistress of the late emperor Titus, soon enters the story with her sons one of whom is an assassin, a member of the Sicarii. He's determined to avenge the defeat of his people and the destruction of their temple--no matter who might get in the way.
They were known as the Sicarii because of the dagger called Sica which they carried with them.
See also, Amy Zalman, "Sicarii: First Century Terrorists", available at: http://terrorism.about.com/od/groupsleader1/p/Sicarii.htm (accessed on November 30, 2012).
Yoram Kaniuk, another Haaretz writer castigates Israelis for being loyal to the lunatic Bibi Netanyahu: "He is a Sicarii in a tie.
Known to the Romans as sicarii, or daggermen, they carried on an underground campaign of assassination of Roman occupation forces, as well as any Jews they felt had collaborated with the Romans.
Four women tell the tale: Yael, the unloved daughter of a Sicarii assassin; Revka, a baker's wife whose daughter is murdered by Roman soldiers; Shirah, a medicine woman in love with a married man; and Aziza, Shirah's daughter, who defies convention by living a soldier's life.
Jewish terrorist group the Sicarii, which comes to us through the writings of Josephus and which constituted the first recorded instance of terrorism in its modern form, signify the first case of superterror?
Their Sicarii hid daggers under their cloaks, mingled with crowds at festivals, murdered their victims, and then disappeared into the panicked gathering.
Popular history describes graphically the efforts of the Zealots (or Sicarii), the Assassins and the Thugees.
The Sicarii would hide short daggers under their cloaks, mingle with crowds at the great festivals, murder their victims, and then disappear into the crowd during the ensuing panic.
Judas' role as part of the Sicarii or Dagger Men, a group of Jewish zealots strongly committed to expelling the Romans from Judea (using Sicarii, or concealed daggers), merits special attention.
The Sicarii in Josephus's Judean War: Rhetorical Analysis and Historical Observations, by Mark Andrew Brighton.