Sicista

Sicista

 

(birch mice), a genus of mammals of the family Diposidae of the order Rodentia. They resemble mice. The body length is up to 8 cm; the naked tail is longer than the body. Of the genus’s ten species, six are found in the USSR. Birch mice inhabit plain and mountain forests and open terrains of temperate and subtropical zones in Europe and Asia. They are active at twilight and feed on insects and seeds. The mice produce one litter a year. They hibernate in the winter. The best-known species are Sicista betulina and S. subtilis.

References in periodicals archive ?
2011: Northern birch mouse (Sicista betulina) in Lithuania, findings in the diet of tawny owl (Strix aluco).
2007: High relative frequency of Sicista subtilis (Dipodidae, Rodentia) in owl-pellets collected in Borsodi Mezoseg (NE Hungary).
Other rodent species, including species in other genera of mice (Apodemus and Sicista) and voles (Eothenomys, Lagurus, and Myodes) are known hosts in Europe (19-21) and Asia (22-24).
The remaining species were encountered much less frequently, and some of them were represented by single animals only (northern birch mouse Sicista betulina Pall., 1778, yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis Melchior, 1834).
nivalis), the roe deer (Capreolus), the deer (Cervus elaphus), the moose (Antes antes), the boar (Sus scrofa), the badger (Meles meles), the otter (Lutra lutra), the squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris), the mountain hare or snow hare (Lepus timidus), the Balkan dormouse (Dryomys nitedula), the fat dormouse (Glis glis), the mole (Microtus oeconomus), shrews (Sorex minutissimus and Sorex caecutiens), 13 species of bats including some noctules (Nyctalus), the yellow-throated field mouse (Apodemus flavicollis), the red mole (Clethrionomys glareolus), the northern birch mouse (Sicista betulina), and the tanuki (Nyctereutes procyonoides), the latter an introduced species.
Another hibernating species--the northern birch mouse (Sicista betulina)--has only a few peculiarities in common with dormice on the northern periphery of its range.
2008: To ecology of the northern birch mouse (Sicista betulina) at the northern margin of its range.
(a) Livonian Bat Group of Sicista Development Centre, Box 111, 50002 Tartu, Estonia
Probably due to this preservation of the traditional landscape, rare steppe rodent species like the Hungarian birch mouse (Sicista (subtilis) trizona), the Transylvanian blind mole-rat (Nannospalax (leucodon) transsylvanicus) and the Mehely's blind mole-rat (Spalax antiquus) are still present here (Nemeth et al.
2015: Rediscovery of the Hungarian birch mouse (Sicista subtilis trizona) in Transylvania (Romania) with molecular characterisation of its phylogenetic affinities.
In comparison to data collected by Masing (1987) in Matsalu, we did not capture common voles (Microtus arvalis) or Northern birch mice (Sicista betulina).