Siegbahn


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Siegbahn

1. Kai . born 1918, Swedish physicist who worked on electron spectroscopy: Nobel prize for physics 1981
2. his father, Karl Manne Georg . 1886--1978, Swedish physicist, who discovered the M series in X-ray spectroscopy: Nobel prize for physics 1924

siegbahn

[′sēg‚bän]
(spectroscopy)
A unit of length, formerly used to express wavelengths of x-rays, equal to 1/3029.45 of the spacing of the (200) planes of calcite at 18°C, or to (1.00202 ± 0.00003) × 10-13 meter. Also known as x-ray unit; X-unit. Symbolized X; XU.
References in periodicals archive ?
Johnston, N., Jernberg, T., Lagerqvist, B., Siegbahn, A.
Siegbahn, "Relationship between interleukin 6 and mortality in patients with unstable coronary artery disease: effects of an early invasive or noninvasive strategy," The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol.
Siegbahn et al., "High-sensitivity troponin T and risk stratification in patients with atrial fibrillation during treatment with apixaban or warfarin," Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol.
(34.) Johnston N, Jernberg T, Lagerqvist B, Siegbahn A, Wallentin L.
Siegbahn (67) pioneered photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids in the 1970s.
[24] Gelius, U, Svensson, S., Siegbahn, H., Basilier, E.; Chem.
Martin was 15 or 16 when he became interested in physics and wrote to the physicist and Nobel laureate Manne Siegbahn, asking for advice regarding his future.
There is a significant difference in the kinetic properties of isoenzymes from a variety of animal sources like their thermal stability and sensitivity to inhibitors (Lippert and Javadpour, 1981; Hagberg and Siegbahn, 1983) .
The invention of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is attributed to Kai Siegbahn who worked at the University of Uppsala, Sweden, in the 1960s.
(74.) Alstrom u, Tyden H, Oldgren J, Siegbahn A, Stahle E.
At his opening address at the 12th Nobel Symposium on Radiocarbon Variations and Absolute Chronology [12] in Uppsala, Nobelist Kai Siegbahn emphasized that "This subject is [now] interesting to specialists in many different fields, as can be seen from the list of participants, showing archaeologists, chemists, dendrochronologists, geophysicists, varved-clay geologists, and physicists" (Ref.
In [sup.109]Cd-based KXRF, the 88.034 keV [Gamma]-rays from [sup.109]Cd are used to fluoresce the K-shell X-rays of lead (in increasing energy, those with Siegbahn notation: K[[Alpha].sub.2], K[[Alpha].sub.1], K[[Beta].sub.1], K[[Beta].sub.3], and K[[Beta].sub.2]).