Sierpinski gasket

Sierpinski gasket

[sir′pin·skē ‚gas·kət]
(mathematics)
A fractal which can be constructed by a recursive procedure; at each step a triangle is divided into four new triangles, only three of which are kept for further iterations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poddar, "Design formula for sierpinski gasket pre-fractal planar-monopole antennas," Journals & Magazines, IEEE Antennas and Propagation, vol.
Multiband Sierpinski gasket is accounted for in [6, 7].
Subdividing an equilateral triangle into four congruent triangles, then doing likewise to each of the three non-central triangles, and then again and again, leads to the Sierpinski gasket, from which the chaos game originated An analogous procedure is hereforth applied to a circle, where a subdivision consists of two pairs of inscribed circles, with each circle tangential to the ones adjacent to it.
Repeating the operation until infinity, the Sierpinski gasket will be done.
The topic include separation conditions for iterated function systems with overlaps, the analysis and geometry of the measurable Riemannian structure on the Sierpinski Gasket, multifractal analysis via scaling zeta functions and recursive structure of lattice strings, Laplacian on Julia sets III: cubic Julia sets and formal matings, and curvature measures of fractal sets.
An overview of different shapes including Koch snowflake/islands fractal iterations, Sierpinski gasket and carpets fractal stages, fractal trees and Hilbert curves is given in [2].
Concerning the geometry of the fractal radiating element, the Sierpinski Gasket fractal iteration index j = 0, ..., J has been stopped to J = 1 and the dual-band behavior has been obtained by acting on the parameters [l.sub.n]; n = 1, ..., 3 (Fig.
In this paper, the performance of three different ANNs on Sierpinski gasket fractal antenna analysis is investigated by means of two aspects: mean absolute error (MAE) and coefficient of correlation.
On more than one occasion, Wallace revealed that he structured Infinite Jest like a Sierpinski gasket, which Max describes as "a geometrical figure that can be subdivided into an infinite number of identical geometrical figures" (183).
The Cantor set, the von Koch snowflake curve and the Sierpinski gasket are some of the most famous examples of such sets.
The Sierpinski gasket is geometry was described by Sierpinski in 1915 [8].
A well-known example of a fractal is the Sierpinski gasket. We shall derive the recursion relations for the numbers of connected spanning subgraphs on the Sierpinski gasket with dimension equal to two, three and four, and determine the asymptotic growth constants.