Sieve of Eratosthenes


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sieve of Eratosthenes

[′siv əv ‚er·ə′täs·thə‚nēz]
(mathematics)
An iterative procedure which determines all the primes less than a given number.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Sieve of Eratosthenes

A benchmark program used to test the mathematical speed of a computer. The program calculates prime numbers based on Eratosthenes's algorithm.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In maths, the Sieve of Eratosthenes is used to calculate what?
step function, fixed-point, iteration map, Newton map, Halley map, sieve of Eratosthenes
The sieve of Eratosthenes is an algorithm [3] providing the prime numbers less than a given integer n [greater than or equal to] 2.
While many students will have seen application of the Sieve of Eratosthenes (http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes) (Figure 1) to the numbers from 1 to 100 they usually do not get to work with large prime numbers (ask any student what is the largest prime number that they know for sure) or indeed, large lists of prime numbers.
With Chartworld, children can easily create models showing: multiples, the commutative property of multiplication, perfect squares, division as the inverse of multiplication, division with remainder, factors, prime numbers, divisibility tests, and the Sieve of Eratosthenes.
The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a classic mathematical concept, used to generate the prime numbers.
Topics include the role of number theory in mathematics education research, understanding number theory's relationship with algebra and arithmetic, appreciating multiplicative structures, repeating patterns, using the Sieve of Eratosthenes in the elementary grades, learning number theory through a chain of discovery, learning number theory in a calculator environment and through geometrical interactive computer programs, problem solving, and revising algebra in a number theory setting.
This process of elimination by trial division is the idea behind the prime-detecting sieve of Eratosthenes, named for a Greek mathematician who lived in the third century B.C.
This C program implements a Sieve of Eratosthenes for computing all primes less than n.
Although the earliest prime numbers are listed in many mathematical reference books, your students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c.
This method is called the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after Eratosthenes (who lived in the third century BC), but is obviously not practical for larger numbers.