Siger de Brabant

Siger de Brabant

(sēzhā` də bräbäN`), fl. 1260–77, French theologian, head of the movement known as Latin Averroism. At the Univ. of Paris he taught that the individual soul had no immortality and that only the universal "active intellect" was immortal. He maintained also that the world had existed from eternity. In an attempt to reconcile these beliefs with Christian faith, Siger adopted the Averroist notion of "double truth"—that something could be true in rational philosophy but false in religious belief. St. Thomas AquinasThomas Aquinas, Saint
[Lat.,=from Aquino], 1225–74, Italian philosopher and theologian, Doctor of the Church, known as the Angelic Doctor, b. Rocca Secca (near Naples).
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 vigorously attacked Siger's teachings, and the doctrines were condemned in Paris in and after 1270. Siger died in Italy.
References in periodicals archive ?
2330 et Siger de Brabant, en <<Ar chivum Fratrum praedicatorum>>, 36 (1966) 153-261.
De hecho, en la segunda mitad del siglo XIII tenemos el caso de maestros de artes, como Siger de Brabant, que nunca dejaron su oficio como maestros de esta facultad (Weijers, 1996, p.
Se cree que esta condena apuntaba al grupo de artistas conocidos bajo el nombre de Averroistas latinos, de los que Siger de Brabant era un digno representante, Siger de Brabant debe finalmente exiliarse y abandonar su puesto como Maestro de la Facultad de Artes.
(1) See the Munich version, in Siger de Brabant. Quaestiones in Metaphysicam (Munich and Vienna versions), ed.
This struggle is exemplified by two exhibitions that took place in the 1950s: Perennite de l'art gaulois, at the Musee pedagogique in 1955, which was organized by the art critic Charles Estienne in association with the surrealist group; and Les Ceremonies commemoratives de la deuxieme condamnation de Siger de Brabant, at the Galerie Kleber in 1957, which was organized by the abstract painters Georges Mathieu and Simon Hantati.
(1) Although there were more than two sides to this conflict, I wish to focus here on two exhibitions that exemplify two different positions on the broader cultural significance of contemporary gestural abstraction: Perennite de l'art gaulois, organized in good part by the critic Charles Estienne (in association with the surrealist poet and theoretician Andre Breton, and with specialists in Gaulish art), at the Musee pedagogique in Paris in 1955; and Les Ceremonies commemoratives de la deuxieme condamnation de Siger de Brabant, organized by the artists Georges Mathieu and Simon Hantai at the Galerie Kleber, again in Paris, in 1957.
Mathieu and Hantai's exhibition was not an art exhibition exactly, but rather a series of events and changing displays that took place over a period of three weeks, which celebrated the Catholic Inquisition's second condemnation for heresy, in 1277, of the teachings of the Aristotelian scholar Siger de Brabant at the University of Paris, whereby the church attempted to halt the revival of classical thought in the Middle Ages.
From this legend, as well as from the appearance in Paradiso X of Siger de Brabant (a professor in Paris in Aquinas's time who expounded the philosophy of Averroes and was charged with heresy), derived works of art and literature in 19thcentury France that attempted to locate Dante very specifically in relation to particular monuments of medieval Paris.
One of the earliest manifestations of this appropriation of Dante by way of expansion of the legend recounted by Boccaccio and implied by the presence of Siger de Brabant in Paradiso, is Honore de Balzac's (b.
Thus, Dante's alleged presence in Paris and his fictional relationship with Siger de Brabant were, in the 19th century, not only endorsed but re-created, in this case by municipal action.
(1) See the seminal two-part article by Rene-Antoine Gauthier, "Notes sur Siger de Brabant, I.
But according to Gauthier, Siger stood trial and was probably acquitted (See "Notes sur Siger de Brabant, II," 27).