silcrete


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silcrete

[′sil‚krēt]
(geology)
A conglomerate of sand and gravel cemented by silica.
References in periodicals archive ?
The silcrete rock undergoes a number of readily identifiable physical changes upon heating, including reddening (Schindler et al.
Fait interessant, certains des outils de pierre ont ete tailles a partir d'une matiere premiere appelee silcrete, provenant d'un site distant de 150 kilometres.
2007, Optically continuous silcrete quartz cements of the St.
A geoarchaeological study of silcrete in the Central Queensland Highlands highlights the importance of geological context in understanding the procurement, use and transport of artefacts.
This was a time period when the energy from floodwaters was very high; large cobbles were pushed across the landscape during flood events and it appears early assemblages of flaked silcrete artefacts were polished and sub-rounded to then lie exposed for millennia in brachiating creeklines fringing the lake.
7 Nature by archaeologist Kyle Brown of the University of Cape Town in South Africa and his colleagues--were made from a type of stone called silcrete that had first been heated to make the rock easier to chip.
From this work, Toro has identified up to seven sand units above the basement and below a confining upper silcrete unit.
Silcrete plant fossils from Lightning Ridge, New South Wales: new evidence for climate change and monsoon elements in the Australian Cenozoic.
Ochre chips were crushed with quartz, quartzite and silcrete hammerstones/grinders and combined with heated crushed, mammal-bone, charcoal, stone chips and a liquid, which was then introduced to the abalone shells and gently stirred.
The heating transformed a stone called silcrete, which was rather poor for tool making, into a raw material that allowed the modern humans to make advanced tools, Marean said.
Additionally, fossiliferous (non-marine bivalves and plants) Eocene sediments are extant as silcrete caps on interfluves (Wilde and Backhouse 1978); these are located at elevations 310-320m a.