Simon Commission


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Simon Commission

 

a commission appointed by the British government in 1927 to report on the working of the constitution in India and to present recommendations for reforms. Its members were from the Conservative, Liberal, and Labour parties. J. A. Simon served as chairman.

The appointment of the commission, which had extremely limited functions and did not include a single representative from India itself, caused a wave of indignation and a growth in the anti-imperialist movement in India. The Indian National Congress Party formulated a demand (December 1927) that India be granted full national independence; the party also called for a boycott of the commission. The boycott campaign took on broad scope and attested to a new upsurge of the national liberation movement in India. The commission’s findings, gathered in India in 1928 and 1929 and published in 1930, resulted in effect merely in a recommendation that the question of the Indian constitution be discussed at a round table conference (seeINDIA ROUND TABLE CONFERENCES).

References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Kohima (Nagaland) [India], January 11 (ANI): Naga people from various states of the country and Myanmar came together today to observe the Naga Day here to commemorate submission of the memorandum on the Naga rights to the Simon Commission in 1929.
But it is a sad fact that the Simon Commission did not consist of a single Indian member.
He recalled that around the time of FICCI's founding in 1927, Indian Industry had united against the Simon Commission that was constituted by the then British Government.
The Simon Commission was presented the Naga Memorandum by the Naga Club which explicitly stated, 'to leave us alone to determine ourselves as in ancient times.
It is obvious that the West Bengal Government should have handled the language issue with greater care, especially when the demand for a separate administrative unit in the Darjeeling area is an old one, going back to 1907 when a hillmen's association wanted it as a part of the Morley-Minto reforms and raised it again with the Simon Commission in 1930.
The evolutionary stages of the Constitution started from Minto Morley Reforms resulting in The Indian Councils Act 1909 followed by Montagu Chelmsford Reforms resulting in the Government of India Act 1919, the 1927 Simon Commission and Round Table Conferences (1930 - 1932) leading to the Government of India Act 1935, the 1946 cabinet Mission Plan and the subsequent formation of the Constituent Assembly.
When the Simon Commission visited Lahore in 1928, Lala Lajpat Rai led the agitation against it.
The long awaited Simon Commission Report was published in May 1930, in which the demand of equal status for the Frontier was neglected.
It was feared that the Simon Commission could take an anti-Indian nationalism stance under the conservative administration.
But the communal hatred and violence which the practice of separate electorates unleashed in the 1920s pushed Jinnah back to an espousal of joint electorates in his last - and futile - attempt to bring about a rapprochement through the Delhi Pact of 1927-28 which he had drafted with Motilal Nehru and Tej Bahadur Sapru as native India's response to the all-British Simon Commission which had been appointed to consider the future constitutional development of India.
We get a kaleidoscopic view of political history of that time, including the Jalianwala Bagh massacre, the Hunter Committee, the Simon Commission, the Congress Party, and the Muslim League, all of which Hussein weaves into the story like a consummate artist, in language that shines on every page.
Entries on the Simon Commission, which in 1929 reappraised the dyarchy government system for Burma, and on the development and nature of nationalism in Burma would be useful.