Simon Magus


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Simon Magus

(mā`gəs), Samaritan sorcerer who attempted to buy spiritual power from the apostles. From this comes the term simonysimony
, in canon law, buying or selling of any spiritual benefit or office. The name is derived from Simon Magus, who tried to buy the gifts of the Holy Spirit from St. Peter (Acts 8). Simony is a very grave sin, and ecclesiastics who commit it may be excommunicated.
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. He is mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles. He was said to have founded a Gnostic sect.

Simon Magus

tried to purchase apostolic powers; whence, simony. [N.T.: Acts 8:18–24]

Simon Magus

New Testament a Samaritan sorcerer, probably from Gitta, of the 1st century ad. After being converted to Christianity, he tried to buy miraculous powers from the apostles (Acts of the Apostles 8:9--24). He is also identified as the founder of a Gnostic sect
References in periodicals archive ?
Ferreiro's 15 chapters examine the literary and artistic reception, throughout the early and medieval Christian periods, of Simon Magus, the messianic magician of Acts 8.
466) did much the same in his compendium of heresies, from Simon Magus again to the Nestorians of his own day.
At the word, she was lifted out the window in rapid flight, sustained, we believe, by the ministry of the evil spirits that once caught Simon Magus up in the air.
My purpose is to compare and contrast how writers appropriated the patristic "types" of Simon Magus and Nicolas of Antioch and adapted them to condemn Islam as heresy and denounce their immorality.
It is therefore in an Eckhartian perspective, which presupposes a certain leniency and even sympathy, towards the phenomenon of heresy, that I am going to give a survey of `the other side of Christianity', from the Acts of Simon Magus, `father of heresy', to the dawn of the second millennium, while exposing the medieval period in greater depth.
She falls for the charms of Rutger Hauer in the upcoming movie Simon Magus.
This 'Wulfstanian' version of the Passio is considerably shorter than either Blickling 15 or AElfric I, 26, being a highly condensed narration of the confrontation between the apostles and Simon Magus, up to and including Simon's attempt to fly.
He appears as a model for the penitent sinner, but also as the judge with power to bind and loose, as with Ananias and Sapphira or with Simon Magus.
Simon Magus proclaimed himself "the divine power that is called Great" (Acts 8:10).
Possessors of the 'apocalyptic imagination' make use of four 'keys' identified by the authors: they impart universal allegorical significance to the details of St John's book while at the same time relating them to specific historical circumstances; they perceive evil as an exact perversion of good; they erase the distinctiveness of individuals to the point where the likes of Antichrist, Nero, and Simon Magus become interchangeable buddies; they have a weakness for number symbolism.
What the author's schematic pagan-Jewish-Christian presentation obscures is the similarity of Jesus to charismatic religious healers who worked the rabble of the Roman east such as Appolonius of Tyana or Simon Magus.
The death-defying hubris of the trapeze artist, like that of the first known aerialist, Simon Magus, may be the theater's supreme declaration of the equation Man = God, and the florescence of the circus and its tropes under even the most repressive totalitarian regimes (where theater, as such, has been interdicted) may be due to more than its ideal ideological innocence.