Simonides of Ceos


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Simonides of Ceos

(sīmŏn`ĭdēz, sē`ŏs), c.556–468? B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Ceos. At Athens for a time under the patronage of Hipparchus, he seems then to have gone to Thessaly, returning to Athens at the time of the Persian Wars. He was a friend of most prominent Athenians. After the wars he went (with his nephew Bacchylides) to the court of Hiero I of Syracuse, where he was a rival of Pindar. There are only fragments left of his work, but they contain some of the finest Greek poetry. He wrote, in an epigrammatic manner, verses of many kinds; some of these—encomia, epinicia, and dirges—he brought to a new perfection. Two of his finest epitaphs are on the fallen at Marathon and at Thermopylae.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, this phrase has to be taken in conjunction with the apophthegm of Simonides of Ceos and popularized by Plutarch that a painting is mute poetry and poetry a speaking picture.
The great age of the dithyramb was also the great age of Greek choral lyric poetry in general; Simonides of Ceos, Pindar, and Bacchylides all composed them.
Nothing remains of the writings of the stoic philosopher Cleanthes except his `Hymn to Zeus', which was known in the Renaissance, and was indeed used to show how compatible stoicism was with Christianity.(7) Simonides of Ceos was a lyric poet and epigrammatist renowned for his opportunism and cupidity.
Since Simonides of Ceos also wrote elegies (all funeral epitaphs), there have been those who regard this poem as his.(47) But this poem shows little of the intellectual subtlety and ambiguity which one expects from Simonides.
Oates' The influence of Simonides of Ceos on Horace, a dissertation dated from 1932 referred to in the more recent survey by Feeney of Horace's debt to Greek lyric in general (1993:41-63).