Simple Substance

Simple Substance

 

a homogeneous substance composed of the atoms of a chemical element; the form of a chemical element existing in a free state. The simple substances diamond, graphite, and coal, for example, are composed of atoms of the element carbon but differ in their structures and properties. Ordinary oxygen O2 and ozone O3 are composed of atoms of the element oxygen but have different molecular weights and very different properties.

The concepts of simple substance and chemical element are often confused even in contemporary literature because the chemical elements and the simple substances they form are usually known by one and the same name. Special names or letter designations are only assigned to those elements that exist in various modified forms, such as white, red, and black phosphorus and white and gray tin (β-Sn and α-Sn, respectively).

References in periodicals archive ?
Each level has several characteristics, ranging from simple substance abuse to previous suicide attempts or the stigma associated with seeking help in therapy.
For example, Kant rejects the view that the soul's substantiality and simplicity imply the soul's permanence, incorruptibility, and immortality, with him opting instead for a view of the soul being a simple substance able to ground mental states.
BO Concept's new Simple Substance collection is full of nature-inspired accessories like this bowl (near right) that will instantly update a sideboard or coffee table.
Lavoisier and colleagues assigned a simple name for each simple substance and for each compound substance a generic name that referred to a given class (e.g.
Joint compound is a simple substance containing plaster of paris, limestone and perlite.
Snow is a simple substance, but it can be a powerful force.
That was the first indication that air was not a simple substance (an element) but a mixture of different gases.
Braconnot then heated gelatin, a substance derived from the connective tissue of animals, and obtained a simple substance that tasted sweet.
While it may appear that Leibniz is leading us to identify a veritable one (an authentically simple substance) with an ostensible many (a plurality of causal powers), I shall demonstrate how such a reading of Leibniz is misguided given an appropriate understanding of the notion of substantial form.
Kant argues that we have an immediate consciousness of the self as a simple substance, and that our simplicity, substantiality, and immediate consciousness of this is necessary for personal identity.
Owner Debora Mache said: "Most people know it's a good idea - water is the most simple substance.
If a simple substance is simply the sum of its accidents, then what grounds are there, after all, for claiming that the world consists of an infinity of substances each with a specific set of properties rather than that the world consists of one substance which somehow manifests all these properties?