SIMPLE

(redirected from Simples)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

simple

1. Chem (of a substance or material) consisting of only one chemical compound rather than a mixture of compounds
2. Maths
a. (of a fraction) containing only integers
b. (of an equation) containing variables to the first power only; linear
c. (of a root of an equation) occurring only once; not multiple
3. Biology not divided into parts
4. Music relating to or denoting a time where the number of beats per bar may be two, three, or four
5. a plant, esp a herbaceous plant, having medicinal properties

simple

[′sim·pəl]
(biology)
Made up of one piece.
Unbranched.
Consisting of identical units, as a simple tissue.

SIMPLE

(1)
Early system on Datatron 200 series. Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959).

SIMPLE

(2)
Simulation of Industrial Management Problems with Lots of Equations. R.K. Bennett, 1958. Predecessor to DYNAMO, for IBM 704.

SIMPLE

(SIP for Instant Messaging and Presence Leveraging Extensions) Enhancements that add instant messaging and presence to the SIP protocol. Developed by the SIMPLE working group of the IETF, SIMPLE adds buddy list subscriptions and notifications and instant messaging commands.

SIMPLE has two modes. Session mode, which is the more efficient mode, sets up the call and provides a raft of features including conferencing. Page mode uses no call setup and is more like a short messaging service for delivering one-shot messages and announcements.

The IETF's Instant Messaging and Presence Protocol (IMPP) working group, from which the SIMPLE group was split off, focuses on helping people build gateways to SIMPLE from other IM systems. In 2001, AOL said it would support SIMPLE, but subsequently abandoned its plans. See SIP.
References in classic literature ?
They are said to be "copies" of sensations, always as regards the simple qualities that enter into them, though not always as regards the manner in which these are put together.
He next explains the difference between simple and complex ideas, and explains that a complex idea may occur without any similar complex impression.
Wordsworth fought the battle of the simple word, and phrase, and thought, and won it.
With Wordworth's simple tastes this sum was enough to live upon for several years, so he asked his dearly loved sister Dorothy to make her home with him, and together they settled down to a simple cottage life in Dorsetshire.
"And I, by agreeing to an unlawful divorce, shall be to blame for her ruin." He had thought it all over hundreds of times, and was convinced that a divorce was not at all simple, as Stepan Arkadyevitch had said, but was utterly impossible.
She knew that Sonya with her severe and simple views would either not understand it at all or would be horrified at such a confession.
Everything is action, simple feeling, or vivid scenes, with no merely abstract moralizing (except in a few unusual cases); and often much of the story or sentiment is implied rather than directly stated.
They are such as make appeal to the underlying human instincts--brave exploits in individual fighting or in organized war, and the romance and pathos and tragedy of love and of the other moving situations of simple life.
As this simple and yet terrible annunciation stole on the ears of the multitude, a stillness as deep and awful succeeded as if the venerated spirit they worshiped had uttered the words without the aid of human organs; and even the inanimate Uncas appeared a being of life, compared with the humbled and submissive throng by whom he was surrounded.
But when they spoke of the future prospects of Cora and Uncas, he shook his head, like one who knew the error of their simple creed, and resuming his reclining attitude, he maintained it until the ceremony, if that might be called a ceremony, in which feeling was so deeply imbued, was finished.
And there are still some who think that, after all, the style is the man; justified, in very great varieties, by the simple consideration of what he himself has to say, quite independently of any real or supposed connection with this or that literary age or school.
Whereas the simple and moderate desires which follow reason, and are under the guidance of mind and true opinion, are to be found only in a few, and those the best born and best educated.