omission

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omission

[ō′mish·ən]
(geology)
The elimination or nonexposure of certain stratigraphic beds at the surface of any specified section because of disruption and displacement of the beds by faulting.
References in periodicals archive ?
I came away from Lampeter with the uncomfortable feeling that though the bishops voted in favour, they had, by a sin of omission, lost the Bill for those who would have voted yes.
IN AN ALARMING sin of omission, pollsters have yet to tell us anything definitive about the so-called Mommy Wars, that haft-imagined battle between the working mothers of overscheduled upper-middle-class children and the stay-at-home mothers of overscheduled upper-middleclass children.
What some might see as a forgivable sin of omission, Singh interprets as equivalent to racism.
"It needs to be clear that there are three syllables," he writes, which, of course, was my sin of omission. `It's the middle syllable that is the hardest.
I was also stunned by what I hadn't been told--the far more sinister and insidious sin of omission. I had long been battling teachers about what they had left out of their lectures or readings on other subjects--dating back to junior high school--but not on the Civil War.
I am constantly amazed at the number of professional associations that commit this sin of omission. The only way to avoid using an apostrophe would be to change the organization's name to the Alaska Association of Growers.
He continued: 'Save for one passing reference it was very revealing, a sin of omission, that...
However, if he's willing to take the risk, it could make the relationship even stronger not least because it will be built on honesty and not on sin of omission.
Call it missed historic opportunity or sin of omission. Dr.
As a child in a Catholic school years ago, I learned that Baptism was to be bestowed as soon after birth as was possible; to delay this for many weeks or months was a sin of omission. Baptism was the gateway to heaven, whereby the infant was joyously absolved of the original sin of Adam and infused with sanctifying grace, and thus was made a true child of God.
Yet as such it commits a sin of omission in not providing a bibliography or suggestions for further reading.
If it is taken to account once more for a similar sin of omission, it may well find itself the target of fines imposed by the judges in Luxembourg.