single inheritance

single inheritance

The property of an object-oriented language which restricts a sub-class to be derived from only one parent. Opposite of multiple inheritance.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

single inheritance

In object-oriented programming, a class that has no more than one parent. Contrast with multiple inheritance.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
In their work, only structural information such as OODB inheritance hierarchies, single inheritance and multiple inheritance are used.
For example, consider a simple single inheritance hierarchy as in Figure 3.a and assume access frequency information on each class as in Figure 3b.
Chernikov draws on statistics to measure the manner in which Peter's law on single inheritance of 1714 affected both members of the nobility and their serfs.
Object-oriented programming in D uses a single inheritance hierarchy.
They range from the trivial (longer names with 63 characters in a name, more continuation lines, longer statements), to the more substantial revisions such as additions to support object-oriented programming: type extension-which provides single inheritance, polymorphic variables, and type-bound procedures--which provide dynamic dispatch.
Figure 8-3 illustrates single inheritance. Single inheritance allows a class to derive from a single base class.
A single inheritance phylogenetic tree (a diagram showing the interrelations of a group derived from a common ancestor) provides a convenient method for the study of phylogenetic relationships (Felsenstein, 1993; Pagel 1999; Pagel & Harvey, 1988).
Because of Ada 83's preexisting support for derived types, this modest generalization is adequate to provide full support for what is called "single inheritance" [10].
The idea that partible inheritance had a negative influence on the economic well-being of noble families is well known; it was set out in the famous Law of Single Inheritance published by Peter the Great in 1714.
Classes support single inheritance, and all classes ultimately derive from a base class called object.
If each new class definition must directly depend on at most one other class definition, we say the language uses single inheritance. If a new class can depend on more than one class we say the language supports multiple inheritance.
Some languages such as Turbo Pascal V5.5 still only allow for single inheritance.

Full browser ?