differential signaling

(redirected from Single-ended signaling)
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differential signaling

Using two wires for each electrical path for high immunity to noise and crosstalk. The signals are sent down one wire as positive and the other as negative, and the circuit at the receiving end derives the signal from the difference between the two.

Differential vs. Single-Ended
Differential signaling is superior to single-ended signaling, where the reference voltage is ground and can vary over long distances. In differential signaling, the reference voltage is controlled. Typically, twisted pairs are used so that external radiation impacts both wires at the same place, and the noise can be detected more easily. See LVDS and SCSI.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most important advantage of balanced circuits with differential-mode operation is higher immunity to environmental noise compared to unbalanced circuits with single-ended signaling [1-3].
Although requiring two signal wires rather than one, differential signals are much more immune to noise than single-ended signaling.
This means that the same two physical data paths alternate between HS differential signaling and LP single-ended signaling.
Application of Mathcad for simulating such single-ended signaling is demonstrated by FIGURES 11 and 12.
Differential pairs are used to specifically create a closely coupled return path for the signal, eliminating most of the single-ended signaling problems (like the aforementioned twisted pair).
Even- and odd-mode analysis also can be utilized for characterization of lumped interconnect structures, even when single-ended signaling schemes are utilized.
Two of the four wires in the cable are used for +5 V (red) and ground (black), the others for differential and single-ended signaling. Generally, logic levels are received by sensing the difference between the D+ (green) and D- (white) lines.

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