Sinodik

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sinodik

 

in Russian, the name given to a list of the deceased members of families, churches, monasteries, and other groups, entrusted to the church so that the deceased might be remembered in prayers. The sinodiki are important historical sources. [23–1251–]

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(53) Archimandrite Leonid, ed., "Makhrishchskii monastyr': Sinodik i vkladnaia kniga," Chteniia, bk.
Demons in a 17th-century Sinodik miniature, for example, are astride clawed horses whose upright, flame-like ears frame their impishly smiling faces (217).
(8) For a demon with a partly erased face in a 17th-century sinodik, see Rossiiskaia natsional'naia biblioteka (RNB) Q.I.1152, 1.
The starting point of Bulychev's study is the memorial list (sinodik) compiled on the order of Ivan the Terrible in 1582-83.
Veselovskii explained the striking diversity of the existing copies of Ivan's sinodik in terms of the activities of the central authorities.
This is why his sinodik included hot only Orthodox but also Western Christians, Muslims, and even witches (baby-vedun'i).