Sinope


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Related to Sinope: Diogenes, Sinopec

Sinope

(sĭnō`pē), in astronomy, one of the 39 known moons, or natural satellites, of JupiterJupiter
, in astronomy, 5th planet from the sun and largest planet of the solar system. Astronomical and Physical Characteristics

Jupiter's orbit lies beyond the asteroid belt at a mean distance of 483.6 million mi (778.
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Sinope

(si-noh -pee) A small satellite of Jupiter, discovered in 1914 by Seth Nicholson. See Jupiter's satellites; Table 2, backmatter.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Sinope

[′sin·ə·pē]
(astronomy)
A small satellite of Jupiter with a diameter of about 17 miles (27 kilometers), orbiting with retrograde motion at a mean distance of about 1.47 × 107 miles (2.37 × 107 kilometers). Also known as Jupiter IX.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
from Pontus near Sinope, in Egypt, the Balearic islands and the island of Lemnos), "paraetonium" (according to Pliny a "chalk" from Libya--the difference between "chalk" and "clay" was not clear to the ancient authors and not even to Agricola), "melium" (from the island of Melos, according to Pliny a white clay), green earth (creta viridis) from Smyrna, orpiment (auripigmentum) and realgar (sandaraca) from Pontus (Vitruvius, 1953, 2004, 2008).
Phocas lived a simple, quiet life in the city of Sinope, in what is now Turkey.
* The Right Reverend Bishop Athenagoras / Bishop of Sinope (Belgium)
The quantity of images is also to be commended: four of the five surviving pages of the sixth-century Sinope gospels (cat.
Her argument is further developed in the second chapter, where she examines the fascinating figure of Aquila of Sinope, the second-century Jewish convert whose word-for-word rending of the Bible earned him the reputation as one of history's worst translators.
Here Seneca makes Diogenes of Sinope (404-323 BCE) typify the Cynic sage of Greek antiquity.
Houellebecq's/Daniel1's "cynicism" is then a more complicated affair that, exactly like Diogenes of Sinope's anti-sectarian ethics, on the one hand queries the particular mores endorsed--and limited--by specific traditions, places, and institutions (such as the State) while on the other it argues for the moral freedom that comes with an explicitly cosmopolitan redefinition of the moral subject.
From the Bibliotheque National de France, department des Manuscrits, four pages of the 43 folios of the Sinope Gospels, Syria or Constantinople (?), sixth century are on view and illustrated full page in the catalogue.
In the Cynic tradition, which dates back to Diogenes of Sinope, the cosmopolitan rejects all communal responsibilities by claiming to be a natural citizen of the cosmos--and nothing else.