sinus

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Related to Sinuses: Paranasal sinuses

sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
Surface landmarks for the junction between the transverse and sigmoid sinuses: application of the "strategic" burr hole for suboccipital craniotomy.
When the sinuses are working properly, mucus will drain into the nasal passages or out the back of the throat.
Mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses: uncomon location.
Balloon catheter dilation of paranasal sinuses continues to gain popularity as a treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis, (1) although varying levels of acceptance and confidence exist.
The frontal sinuses are most frequently affected (60-65%), followed by the ethmoid (20-30%), maxillary (10%) and sphenoid (2-3%).
Orbital mucoceles arising from the frontal and etmoidal sinuses frequently present with proptosis or palpable mass in the periorbital area, while the maxillary and sphenoidal sinus mucoceles are less common and related to optic neuropathy and decreased visual acuity.
Paranasal mucoceles are most commonly found in the frontal sinus, and are occasionally found in the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses. Maxillary sinus mucoceles are relatively rare, accounting for no more than 10% of all the reported mucocele cases.
The current study used 20 human cadaver specimens with 40 intact sinuses, as test subjects for three transcrestal surgical techniques.