Sippar


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Sippar

(sĭpär`), ancient city of N Babylonia, on the Euphrates in present Iraq, 20 mi (32 km) SW of Baghdad. It was one of the capitals of Sargon and had a great temple to the sungod Shamash. Excavations begun in 1882 have yielded thousands of inscribed clay tablets.
References in periodicals archive ?
(12.) Herodotus, 59-60; Nabonidus, "The Cylinder of Nabonidus from Sippar, Chroncile of Nabonidus," in Glassner, 235.
While the rape-murder had initially been attributed to local anti-Iraqi forces by the neighbors who had responded to the fire, the news that it had in fact been perpetrated by Americans solidified the Janabi tribal allegiance to AQI in Iraq, enabling the establishment of a full-fledged training facility in the ruins of ancient Sippar and the village.
Scurlock does not mention that known Late Babylonian medical compositions (series) from Uruk, Babylon, and Sippar (fifth century BC) show a different organization of medical knowledge, constructed into pirsus 'divisions' ('chapters'), or into nishus 'excerpt (tablets)', while some manuscripts were even designated as coming from the family-houses (bitu) of healers (Panayotov 2018).
Tenders are invited for Lining of watercourse O/L RD 16000-R Sippar Jamalpur Minor (Extn.)
Seleucia on the Euphrates was probably located at the site of or in the vicinity of earlier Sippar.
Tenders are invited for Lining of W/C O/L RD 15400-L Sippar Jamalpur Minor
The oldest textual witnesses available originate from Assur and Kalhu, which is unexpected for a decidedly Babylonian text, whereas the youngest exemplars may come from Uruk and Sippar. Tablets of known provenance were found in four different temples (at Kalhu, Me-Turnat, Sippar, and Uruk) and in a palace.
The Arrows of the Sun: Armed Forces in Sippar in the First Millennium B.C..
In a commentary on this text from Neo-Babylonian Sippar we find the following explanations for some of the terms that appear in the above two lines:
Texts containing the "Decad" were found at Nippur, Ur, Kish, Isin, Sippar, Babylon, Susa, Uruk, Larsa, and Meturan, which leads Delnero to a discussion of local or regional variation in chapter 3.
Das Onomastikon der Beamten am neubabylonischen Ebabbar-Tempel in Sippar. ZA 91: 110-11.
A.56: who serves as temple overseer of Sippar, Nippur, or Babylon,