Sitka


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Sitka

(sĭt`kə), city (1990 pop. 8,588), Sitka census div., SE Alaska, in the Alexander Archipelago, on Baranof Island; inc. 1971. Fishing, its first industry, remains important; salmon, halibut, red snapper, crab, herring, abalone, and clams are caught. There are canneries, and tourism is also economically significant. Sitka was founded (1799) by Aleksandr BaranovBaranov, Aleksandr Andreyevich
, 1747–1819, Russian trader, chief figure in the period of Russian control in Alaska. When his Siberian business faltered, Baranov accepted (1790) an offer to become managing agent of a Russian fur-trading company on Kodiak Island.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Destroyed by Tlingits in 1802, the settlement was rebuilt as Novoarkhangelsk and became the flourishing capital of Russian America. There, in 1867, the United States officially took possession of Alaska from Russia. Renamed after the purchase of Alaska, Sitka remained the capital until 1900. The Univ. of Alaska Southeast campus and Sheldon Jackson College are in the city. Points of interest include Sitka National Historical Park, scene of a decisive battle (1804) between the Russians and the Tlingit; the Russian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Michael (built 1844–48); and Castle Hill, site of the transfer of Alaska to the United States, which is commemorated by the annual Alaska Day Festival in October. State logging championships are also held in Sitka. Mt. Edgecumbe, on an island to the west, can be seen from Sitka's harbor.

Sitka

 

a city in the USA, in southeastern Alaska, on the western coast of Baranof Island. Population, 3,400(1970).

Sitka is a port on the Pacific’s Sitka Sound. Industry is represented by pulp manufacturing and fishing. The city was founded in 1799 by the Russian-American Company and named Novoarkhangel’sk in 1804. In 1809 it became the administrative and chief commercial center for Russian settlements in America. In 1867, after Alaska was sold to the USA, Novoarkhangel’sk became the capital of Alaska and was renamed Sitka. In 1906 the capital was moved to Juneau. [23–1426–]

Sitka

a town in SE Alaska, in the Alexander Archipelago on W Baranof Island: capital of Russian America (1804--67) and of Alaska (1867--1906). Pop.: 8876 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
SITKA IT OUT Forestry Industry Ireland chair Mark McCauley speaks to crowd as Richard Bruton looks on
Sitka Food Business Innovation Contest awarded a $1,500 prize each to Dumag and Kyle, while Ward won $250.
MSRP: $449 (jacket); $439 (bibs); $279 (vest); $199 (pack) CONTACT: Sitka Gear, 877-748-5247; www.sitkagear.com
Canadian national life sciences venture CDRD said on Monday that it has committed USD1.2m in investment in Sitka Biopharma, a preclinical biotechnology company.
GCIs partnership with Sitka Electric Utility is helping to create a safer and better-connected community through expanded connectivity, said Warren Russell, vice president of GCI Southeast Regional Operations.
We use the opportunity afforded by the declassification of Project SITKA documents to explore how actuarial risk systems can be presented as an objective and calculative measure for policing social movements that, while mobilizing claims of objectivity and crime-fighting potentials, significantly amplify strategic incapacitation techniques used by policing agencies that target, in this particular case, Indigenous movements.
In July, Sitka introduced a wader system, Delta Waders, that has been in research and development the past four seasons.
The Battle of Sitka lasted five days until the Tlingit ran out of gunpowder, retreated, and abandoned Sitka Island.
Mosey down to the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology (sitka center.org) near Otis.
Forestry Commission Scotland said sitka spruce trees at a single Galloway site were infected.
The luncheon event hosted by the Vancouver-based Sitka Foundation and the Aga Khan University made special mention of the philanthropic works of mining titans Ross Beaty and Lukas Lundin.