Sjögren's syndrome

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Related to Sjogren syndrome: systemic lupus erythematosus, Scleroderma, Lupus

Sjögren's syndrome

[′shō·grənz ‚sin‚drōm]
(immunology)
An autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of salivary and lacrimal glands, damage by T lymphocytes within the glands may be accompanied by damage by immune complexes throughout the body.
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Relation of sensory peripheral neuropathy in Sjogren syndrome to anti-Ro/SSA.
Life Extension's updated Sjogren syndrome (/Protocols/Immune-Connective- Joint/Sjogren- Syndrome/Page-01) protocol summarizes the latest research and emerging treatment options for this troublesome condition.
The pulmonary manifestations of Sjogren syndrome include interstitial pneumonia, tracheobronchial disorders, and lymphoproliferative disorders [3].
Henriksson, "Autoantibodies present before symptom onset in primary Sjogren syndrome," Journal of the American Medical Association, vol.
In primary Sjogren syndrome, neurological manifestations can be protean and involve both peripheral and central nervous systems, as exemplified by our patient, whose clinical picture included cognitive impairment, hallucinations, extrapyramidal features, and sensory ataxia.
Qiuju, "Analysis of the expression of AQP5 in rats with Sjogren syndrome intervened by Detoxicating Medicine, Meridians-relieving Medicine and Engender Fluid Medicine," China Medical Herald, vol.
To validate this, 12 months after the end point of our study, another review was performed, finding out that only 1 out of 35 undiagnosed patients suffered changes in symptoms or serological markers, giving the clinicians enough data to diagnose the patient with Sjogren Syndrome (data not shown).
Sjogren syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands.
Systemic symptoms that occur alone or with other autoimmune disorders are part of secondary Sjogren syndrome. Patients can present with a variety of confounding conditions, including arthralgia, arthritis, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, Raynaud's phenomenon, vasculitis, pulmonary disease, biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune thyroiditis, anemias, renal disease, alopecia, and lymphoma (Chang et al., 2010; Fox, 2014; Miller et al., 2011).
Incidence of physician-diagnosed primary Sjogren syndrome in residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota.
Literature survey depicts the prevalence of extraglandular and renal involvement is about 30 and 9 percent respectively in primary Sjogren's syndrome.13 Since many patients present with extra-glandular clinical features laboratory studies also play an important role in diagnosis of Sjogren syndrome supported by clinical findings according to the American-European Consensus group.1