Skidbladnir

Skidbladnir

ship large enough to hold all the gods and their possessions, yet so skillfully wrought by dwarves that it could be folded and pocketed. [Scand. Myth.: Bulfinch]
See: Magic
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Some of the avatars have escaped New York City and are on their way to Africa in Thor's folding boat Skidbladnir. Diana is nearly dead from a stab wound to the stomach; Tigre is trying to tend to her; Kali vents her frustration on the gods who are trying to make the voyage as miserable as possible; and Gus is just trying to hold it together.
To be sure, the symbolic references of the ship extend as far back as the Bronze Age in Scandinavia, from about 1600 B.C., and its connotations link it to many other themes in our inquiry: "The ship was associated with the sun disk, with what is thought to be the sacred marriage, with the tree of life, and also with huge figures which may represent the Sky God."(51) In later times, a myth of Freyr relates his ownership of a magic boat, Skidbladnir, large enough to contain all the gods, but small enough to be folded into a purse.