Skirmish Line


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Skirmish Line

 

a battle formation used by motorized rifle squads, platoons, and companies during an advance. In such a formation, troops are deployed in a single line along the front at intervals of 6–8 m (eight to 12 paces). An individual may move slightly forward or to the side to improve his fire position or to better adapt himself to the terrain, as long as he neither breaks the general continuity of the formation’s front nor hinders his neighbors. First used in the second half of the 19th century, the skirmish line appeared in response to the widespread use of rifled weapons, against which troops in columns sustained heavy losses (seeBATTLE FORMATIONS) .

References in periodicals archive ?
To enhance the effectiveness of his skirmish line, Morgan separated the Georgia and Carolinian militia and appealed to their rivalry.
Back down the trail, Blocker signaled Lewis--the men were deployed in a skirmish line and ready.
If you think about a big arc way out here where I said the SIGINT skirmish line was, then I've got this tight knot in here where we circle the wagons for American national security information.
Although they had begun the war with a noticeable advantage in light infantry, the Federals now found themselves at a disadvantage on the skirmish line. Their best sharpshooter units, the 1st and 2nd U.S.S.S., were by now severely understrength, and these two regiments (plus half a dozen independent companies) were just not enough to deal with the Confederate sharpshooter battalions.
"On October 7, he was taken prisoner on the skirmish line at Battle of New Market Road and he is now in the hands of the enemy."
They eventually adopted two techniques - the Augmented Skirmish Line and the Tango Team.
The most common formation is the standard skirmish line. This formation quickly and effectively differentiates the crowd from the police.
A significant weakness of the standard skirmish line concept is the span of control.
The augmented skirmish line provides a method of deploying officers in a riot squad formation, while maintaining control of the personnel involved.
As the police wielded clubs, clearing the area in front of the Hilton, guardsmen moved in fast and set up skirmish lines. The demonstrators scattered and ran, with police chasing.
The Indians throughout displayed a courage and skill that elicited universal praise; they abstained from scalping, let captive women go free, did not commit indiscriminate murder of peaceful families, which is unusual, and fought with almost scientific skill, using advance and rear guards, skirmish lines, and field fortifications."
He published several franchise-related materials, including an article in the ABA publication Business Lawyer titled "Franchising-Changing Legal Skirmish Lines or Armageddon?