Skirmish Line


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Skirmish Line

 

a battle formation used by motorized rifle squads, platoons, and companies during an advance. In such a formation, troops are deployed in a single line along the front at intervals of 6–8 m (eight to 12 paces). An individual may move slightly forward or to the side to improve his fire position or to better adapt himself to the terrain, as long as he neither breaks the general continuity of the formation’s front nor hinders his neighbors. First used in the second half of the 19th century, the skirmish line appeared in response to the widespread use of rifled weapons, against which troops in columns sustained heavy losses (seeBATTLE FORMATIONS) .

References in periodicals archive ?
Back down the trail, Blocker signaled Lewis--the men were deployed in a skirmish line and ready.
If you think about a big arc way out here where I said the SIGINT skirmish line was, then I've got this tight knot in here where we circle the wagons for American national security information.
The skirmish line usually consists of a line of officers with hats and bats, several line backers, and a leader.
A significant weakness of the standard skirmish line concept is the span of control.
The augmented skirmish line provides a method of deploying officers in a riot squad formation, while maintaining control of the personnel involved.
A skirmish line of cauliflower-shaped thunderheads soon began advancing from the west; it was time to move on to Kern's south fork, an 8-mile hike away.
Skirmish lines are not pretty, and, as we all know, the events of that day were exacerbated by command and control problems that have already been brought to light.
The Indians throughout displayed a courage and skill that elicited universal praise; they abstained from scalping, let captive women go free, did not commit indiscriminate murder of peaceful families, which is unusual, and fought with almost scientific skill, using advance and rear guards, skirmish lines, and field fortifications.
He published several franchise-related materials, including an article in the ABA publication Business Lawyer titled "Franchising-Changing Legal Skirmish Lines or Armageddon?
The skirmish lines separating the camps have not always been easy to discern, but have been captured in Stephen Mulhall and Adam Swift's carefully crafted 1992 analysis Liberals and Communitarians: "In terms of substantive political issues, what this means is that where the debate between redistributive liberals and libertarians centres on the justifiability of the welfare state and the taxation required to pay for it, that between the liberal and the communitarian concerns itself rather with the importance of the individual's right to choose her own way and to express herself freely, even where this conflicts with the values and commitments of the community or society of which she is a member.
I'm not talking about the officers who were on the skirmish lines, but those who made the decisions.
Having stood in a number of skirmish lines over a 36-year career in law enforcement, I find it easy to see that the expedient route to getting people to leave has almost always been costly.