Skyscraper construction

Skyscraper construction

A method of construction developed in Chicago, in which all building loads are transmitted to a metal skeleton, so that any exterior masonry is simply a protective cladding.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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READ: Skyscraper construction is lifting the Middle East's elevator market
Although this is a slight decrease from 2016, when China completed 83 such buildings, or 65 per cent of the global total, China is still by far the world leader in skyscraper construction. In fact, the city with the most 200-plus-meter building completions, Shenzhen, finished 12 buildings, or 8.3 per cent of the year's total - more than any other country on the list, except China.
The financial sector might be nervously glancing over its shoulder at China's apparent economic slowdown, but there are seemingly no such concerns in the world of Chinese skyscraper construction. 62 new buildings over 200m tall were added to China's cities last year, far more than the rest of the world.
To be fair, the development of denser forms of concrete and steel has made skyscraper construction easier, allowing the core structure to eat up less space.
A tight, tense one-man show that unfolds virtually in real time from the claustrophobic confines of a speeding BMW, "Locke" shows a very different side of the intense British actor, who plays a mellow skyscraper construction manager dodging an important work obligation in order to deal with a tricky personal issue.
Skyscraper construction is booming across the Middle East, with the region projected to have nearly 300 skyscrapers of at least 150 metres tall by 2015, according to the recent study entitled "The Middle East: 20 Years of Building Skyscrapers" from the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.
Especially if you have the likes of, I don't know, Popeye or Harold Lloyd six steps ahead of you ensuring you don't fall down manholes, or plummet from the high steel of a skyscraper construction site.
The antagonist symbolizes the contradictory concepts of both urban destruction and skyscraper construction. The human characters exhibit no surprise whatsoever when suddenly faced with phenomena that have no explanation.
Though few of us have heard of structural engineer Fazlur Khan, in the 1960s he revolutionized skyscraper construction by devising a framing system around a tubular core that increased structural stability, allowing buildings to "rise to unprecedented heights," Ascher writes.
agreed to make new apprentice classes at least one-third minority, in exchange for laws increasing use of apprentices in skyscraper construction. This deal made the Kennedy administration look good on civil rights, pleased business by containing costs, and strengthened the union.
continues to decline in skyscraper construction, accounting for only 9% of buildings completed in 2010 (compared to 21% in 2009).