fifth disease

(redirected from Slapped cheek syndrome)
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fifth disease:

see parvovirusparvovirus
, any of several small DNA viruses that cause several diseases in animals, including humans. In humans, parvoviruses cause fifth disease, or erythema infectiosum, an acute disease usually affecting young children.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'My son came down with slapped cheek syndrome at school and I'm glad it started there because it looks exactly like it sounds and you half expect social services to turn up at your door.
"My wife had a quick look online and thought that it might be slapped cheek syndrome [parvovirus].
Slapped cheek syndrome, sometimes called fifth disease due to a mild viral infection which can be confused with scarlet fever and German measles in children.
SLAPPED CHEEK SYNDROME "The most obvious symptom is a very distinctive red rash on the cheeks, which gives the condition its name," said Dr Piccaver.
The 26-year-old from Rhyl had unknowingly been struck down with the illness, which is most common in childhood and often called "slapped cheek syndrome" because it causes a rash or reddening to the face.
"It's horrible thinking how close we came to losing my baby," reflects Rachel, 37, who was exposed to parvovirus B19 - also known as "slapped cheek syndrome" for the distinctive red facial rash it can produce - while pregnant.
The 25-year-old from Rhyl had unknowingly been struck down with the illness, which is most common in childhood and often called "slapped cheek syndrome" because it causes a rash or reddening to the face.
A common one is slapped cheek syndrome, or Fifth disease, which is caused by the parvovirus.
The closure was ordered after half of the pupils and two members of staff developed symptoms of the highly infectious infection Parvovirus B19 or "slapped cheek syndrome" which can cause a rash, fever, nausea and flu-like symptoms.
Pupils and staff at a Northumberland first school have been struck down with a skin infection called Slapped Cheek Syndrome.