Slash-and-Burn Farming

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Slash-and-Burn Farming

 

a primitive farming system in which agricultural crops were raised for several years on land that had been cleared by the cutting and burning of trees. The land was abandoned when it became infertile and new land was developed. Natural vegetation restored fertility to the soil.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many farmers use slash-and-burn farming to clear forest.
Slash-and-burn farming has become rampant on the mountain, aggravating occasional timber poaching and hunting of threatened species like the talking mynah and blue-naped parrot, which are popular pets even among the locals.
He knows slash-and-burn farming is illegal and that doing so, year after year, helps sicken millions in the Indian capital and beyond.
Illegal logging, slash-and-burn farming and charcoal making have been identified as the main causes of deforestation at Ipo Dam.
The Ipo Dam, for one, is still experiencing several illegal logging, slash-and-burn farming, and charcoal making as the main causes of deforestation.
Heavy siltation is attributed to change in weather as well as illegal logging, kaingin or slash-and-burn farming practices.
To build on this, consumers and markets also need to send signals to companies that directly or indirectly support slash-and-burn farming. The 2014 Indonesia Palm Oil Pledge -- in which five major producers committed to more sustainable solutions that preclude deforestation, respect human and community rights, and deliver shareholder value -- is a good model.
Traditional slash-and-burn farming practices have steadily eroded their environment and way of life, creating a destructive cycle that decreases land productivity each year and pushes farmers to clear still more forest.
When farmers practice slash-and-burn farming in clearings, the half destroyed forests are proliferated by fires.
They focused not on nations, but on types of societies--hunter-gatherers such as those found in Africa and South America; horticulturalists, or small, low-tech slash-and-burn farming communities typical of South America, Africa, and Asia; pastoralists, the herders of East Africa and Central Asia; and land-owning farmers and peasants who use ploughs in India, pre-modern Europe, and parts of Africa.
Indigenous leaders from the Philippine island of Mindanao warned in December that 500 hectares of jatropha had already displaced food crops like rice, corn and bananas.Aa Deforestation for palm oil crops, which can also be refined into biofuel, has also triggered vast fires through slash-and-burn farming in Indonesia.