latency

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Related to Sleep latency: MSLT

latency

[′lat·ən·sē]
(computer science)
The waiting time between the order to read/write some information from/to a specified place and the beginning of the data-read/write operation.
(medicine)
The stage of an infectious disease, other than the incubation period, in which there are neither clinical signs nor symptoms.
(physiology)
The period between the introduction of and the response to a stimulus.
(psychology)
The phase between the Oedipal period and adolescence, characterized by an apparent cessation of psychosexual development.

latency

(communications)
1. The time it takes for a packet to cross a network connection, from sender to receiver.

2. The period of time that a frame is held by a network device before it is forwarded.

Two of the most important parameters of a communications channel are its latency, which should be low, and its bandwidth, which should be high. Latency is particularly important for a synchronous protocol where each packet must be acknowledged before the next can be transmitted.

latency

(1) Essentially any delay or lapse in time. In general, it is the time between initiating a request in the computer and receiving the answer. Data latency may refer to the time between a query and the results arriving at the screen or the time between initiating a transaction that modifies one or more databases and its completion.

Disk latency is the time it takes for the selected sector to be positioned under the read/write head. Channel latency is the time it takes for a computer channel to become unoccupied in order to transfer data. Network latency is the delay introduced when a packet is momentarily stored, analyzed and then forwarded.

(2) With malicious software, latency is the period between infection and the first obvious damage to the host system. Many viruses or logic bombs written by amateurs have a short latency and are therefore relatively easy to detect; however, more vicious malware can lie dormant or replicate to many other hosts and then wreak havoc unexpectedly. See logic bomb and virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
818) were more towards the positive side of the scale and it just took a maximum of 15 minutes for most of the students (n=233, 64%) to accomplish transition from wakefulness to sleep; however, this duration ranged from (16-30) minutes for 26% (n=95), (31-45) minutes for 5% (n=17) and (46-60) minutes for 4% (n=15) of the respondents; only 1% (n=2) of them had sleep latency above 60 minutes.
Sleep latency and sleep duration were also positively correlated indicating that the greater number of minutes it takes to fall asleep, the shorter the number of hours slept.
Clinical course, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test.
A perfect correlation between REM sleep latency and insomnia variables was identified at a significant level.
Sleep quality variables (subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep disturbance, daytime dysfunction, and sleep medicine) were used in a stepwise multiple regression analysis to predict GHI.
For people diagnosed with insomnia, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is as effective in reducing sleep latency and prolonging sleep time as medication, and with better long-term outcomes, and is a recommended first-line therapy.
The frequency of dosage per day moderated the sleep latency effect, with each additional dose per day increasing the effect size by 0.
The PSQI sleep latency score showed significant correlations with TST (negative and moderately strong) and TRT (moderately strong) in the NS group, while the PSQI sleep latency score had a negatively and moderately strong correlation with the PSG sleep onset latency score in the PS group.
prescribed pregnant women iron-rich foods and folic acid to reduce their sleep latency caused by RLS.
Nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) showed reduced average sleep latency at 6 to 8 minutes, increased number of awakenings, disturbed sleep-wake cycle, shortened REM latency (the patient entered REM sleep immediately), and increased proportion of REM.
These components include subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleep medication, and daytime dysfunction over the last month.
It is a total measure and seven components such as sleep latency, sleep duration, sleep efficacy, sleep disturbance, perceived sleep quality, use of sleep medication and daytime dysfunction.