circadian rhythm

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Related to Sleep-wake cycle: circadian rhythm

circadian rhythm:

see rhythm, biologicalrhythm, biological,
or biorhythm,
cyclic pattern of physiological changes or changes in activity in living organisms, most often synchronized with daily, monthly, or annual cyclical changes in the environment.
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circadian rhythm

[sər′kād·ē·ən ′rith·əm]
(physiology)
A self-sustained cycle of physiological changes that occurs over an approximately 24-hour cycle, generally synchronized to light-dark cycles in an organism's environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sleep-wake cycle changes may be an early sign of emerging cognitive problems that will lead to dementia regardless of changes in our activity.
She and Holmes used that biological data to develop an 11-equation model of the sleep-wake cycle.
By sleeping late on weekends, Macejka was disrupting her the sleep-wake cycle for the whole week.
Studies with adults have documented that patterns in the sleep-wake cycle are related to mood symptoms associated with BP.
The group observed the growth of newly born mice that has been exposed under bright light environment for 24 hours and discovered that the brain cell of the sleep-wake cycle was severely damaged.
Crossing three or more time zones disrupts circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle.
Of the 32 patients in the study, 28 were diagnosed with sleep onset insomnia, 5 had delayed sleep phase syndrome, 4 had sleep-maintenance insomnia, and 2 had a sleep-wake cycle disruption.
It's also possible that, for some reason, your sleep-wake cycle is out of whack.
Preliminary findings of studies conducted in rats suggest that developmental alcohol exposure may indeed interfere with circadian clock function as evidenced by a shortened circadian sleep-wake cycle and changes in the release of certain brain chemicals (i.
Researchers believe that changes in the sleep-wake cycle (circadian rhythms) or decreases in sensory input may be linked to the onset of confusion in the late afternoon and evening.
The observation led to the hypothesis that the missing orexin somehow alters the mouse's sleep-wake cycle and causes a condition similar to narcolepsy, he said.