Sleuthing


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Related to Sleuthing: preliminary, potentially, sought

Sleuthing

See also Crime Fighting.
Alleyn, Inspector
detective in Ngaio Marsh’s many mystery stories. [New Zealand Lit.: Harvey, 520]
Archer, Lew
tough solver of brutal crimes. [Am. Lit.: Herman, 94–96]
Brown, Father
Chesterton’s priest and amateur detective. [Br. Lit.: Herman, 20–21]
Bucket, Inspector
shrewd detective solves a murder and uncovers Lady Dedlock’s past. [Br. Lit.: Bleak House in Benét, 144]
Campion, Albert
unpretentious cerebral detective. [Br. Lit.: Herman, 31–33]
Carrados, Max
blind detective in stories by Ernest Bramah. [Br. Lit.: Barnhart, 159]
Carter, Nick
turn-of-the-century flatfoot. [Radio: “Nick Carter, Master Detective” in Buxton, 173-174]
Chan, Charlie
imperturbable Oriental gumshoe. [Am. Lit.: Her-man, 36–37; Comics: Horn, 165–166]
Charles, Nick
urbane and witty private detective. [Am. Lit.: The Thin Man]
Clouseau, Inspector Jacques
bungling French detective; inexplicably and with great asininity gets his man. [Am. Cinema: “The Pink Panther”]
Columbo
untidy, cigar-smoking mastermind. [TV: “NBC Mystery Movie” in Terrace, II, 141]
Cuff, Sergeant
first detective in English fiction. [Br. Lit.: The Moonstone in Benét, 683]
Drew, Nancy
teenage girl supersleuth. [Children’s Lit.: The Hidden Staircase]
Drummond, Bulldog
patriotic Englishman, hero of stories by Sapper. [Br. Lit.: Payton, 108]
Dupin, Auguste
ratiocinative solver of unsolvable crimes. [Am. Lit.: Poe “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”; “The Mystery of Marie Roget”; “The Purloined Letter”]
Fell, Dr. Gideon
fat, astute detective in John Dickson Carr’s mysteries. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 170]
Fosdick, Fearless
square-jawed, low-paid detective of question-able expertise and unquestionable obtuseness. [Comics: “Li’l Abner” in Horn, 450]
Hardy Boys
teenagers solve crimes and mysteries with detective father. [Children’s Lit.: Clue in the Embers; Twisted Claw; Tower Treasure]
Hawkshaw
implacable detective with photographic memory. [Br. Lit.: The Ticket-of-Leave Man, Barnhart, 546]
Holmes, Sherlock
the great detective; famous for deductive reasoning. [Br. Lit.: Payton, 316]
inverness
coat with cape; emblem of Sherlock Holmes. [Br. Costume and Lit.: Espy, 267]
Lane, Drury
Barney Ross’s deaf ex-actor and amateur detective. [Am. Lit.: Herman, 105]
Lecoq, Monsieur
meticulous detective; pride of French Sureté. [Fr. Lit.: Monsieur Lecoq]
Lestrade
bungling Scotland Yard foil to Sherlock Holmes. [Br. Lit.: Payton, 387]
Lupin, Arsène
murderer turned detective. [Fr. Lit.: Herman, 20]
magnifying glass
traditional detective equipment; from its use by Sherlock Holmes. [Br. Lit.: Payton, 473]
Maigret, Inspector
studiously precise detective; bases his work solidly on police methods. [Fr. Lit.: Herman, 114]
Mannix
private eye with unorthodox style. [TV: Terrace, II, 62]
Marlowe, Philip
hard-boiled but engaging private eye. [Am. Lit.: The Big Sleep; Farewell, My Lovely; The Long Goodbye]
Marple, Miss
sweet old lady, tougher than she seems. [Br. Lit.: Herman, 51–55]
Mason, Perry
attorney busier with detection than law. [Am. Lit.: Herman, 71–74]
Mayo, Asey
the “codfish Sherlock.” [Am. Lit.: Herman, 122–124]
McGee, Travis
tough private eye and tougher private avenger. [Am. Lit.: Herman, 92–94]
Moto, Mr
. clever Japanese detective. [Am. Cin.: Halliwell, 494]
Pinkertons
famous detective agency; founded in 1850. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 392]
Poirot, Hercule
brainy, dandified genius in Christie mysteries. [Br. Lit.: Herman, 51–55]
Pollifax, Mrs
. redoubtable widow joins the C.I.A. [Am. Lit.: A Palm for Mrs. Pollifax]
Pudd’nhead Wilson
lawyer uses fingerprint evidence to win his client’s acquittal and expose the true murderer. [Am. Lit.: Mark Twain Pudd’nhead Wilson; Benét, 824]
Queen, Ellery
dilettantish private investigator. [Am. Lit.: Her-man, 105]
Rabbi, the
Rabbi David Small solves crimes using his Talmudic training. [Am. Lit.: Friday the Rabbi Slept Late]
Saint, the
dashing diviner of knotty puzzles. [Radio: Buxton, 206; TV: Terrace, II, 264]
Spade, Sam
hard-boiled private eye. [Am. Lit.: Herman, 79–82]
Strangeways, Nigel
urbane solver of intricate crimes. [Br. Lit.: Herman, 37–38]
Thatcher, John Putnam
charming, civilized, urbane detective. [Am. Lit.: Herman, 86–87]
Tibbs, Virgil
California’s brilliant, black detective. [Am. Lit.: In the Heat of the Night]
Tracy, Dick
square-chinned detective of police comic strip. [Comics: Horn, 206]
Vance, Philo
impressively learned, polished, and urbane detective. [Am. Lit.: Herman, 22, 126–127]
Wimsey, Lord Peter
Shakespeare-quoting gentleman turned amateur detective. [Br. Lit.: Herman, 113–114]
Wolfe, Nero
corpulent, lazy, but persevering crime-solver. [Am. Lit.: Herman, 119–122]
References in periodicals archive ?
Morrison's sympathy for dark-skinned Pecola is thus juxtaposed against her undergraduate predilection for "pretty-girl" popularity, with Duvall commenting that he is not criticizing her, "since people during their young adulthood often participate in activities that they later find suspect." The tone of schoolmasterish forgiving in this sentence recurs (we hear often, in a raised-eyebrows sort of way, of Morrison's having been a beauty queen), and it makes me wonder two things: At this level of sleuthing, who'd escape whipping?
Kristen Bell returns as the titular character who's tempted back to the world of sleuthing when an old flame is accused of murder.
Felicity plays Rosemary, who with her green-fingered sleuthing partner Laura Thyme (Pam Ferris) investigates the death of a tennis player at an upmarket Spanish holiday resort.
When the sleuthing business or a stakeout is at a lull, private investigator Savannah Reid passes the time reading steamy romance novels.