Slevogt, Max

Slevogt, Max

(mäks slā`fôkht), 1868–1932, German painter. Slevogt, together with Max Liebermann and Lovis Corinth, was among the principal exponents of German impressionism and was influenced by Millet and Courbet. A prolific painter, he attempted to capture movement through broad, informal brush work. His portrait of the singer Francisco d'Andrade as Don Giovanni (1902) is in the Staatsgalerie, Stuttgart.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Slevogt, Max

 

Born Oct. 8, 1868, in Landshut, Bavaria; died Sept. 20, 1932, on the estate of Neukastel, Palatinate. German painter and graphic artist; representative of late impressionism.

Slevogt studied under W. Dietz at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich from 1885 to 1889 and attended the Académie Julien in Paris in 1889. His works, which include portraits, landscapes, and still lifes, are characterized by a somewhat sketchy treatment of form, bold, flowing brushstrokes, and an emotional atmosphere created by the use of chiaroscuro (D’Andrade as Don Juan, 1912. National Gallery, Berlin; landscapes of Egypt, 1914, Dresden Picture Gallery). Slevogt was also an illustrator.

REFERENCE

Imiela, H.-J. M. Slevogt. Karlsruhe, 1968.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.