Sloan Digital Sky Survey


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Sloan Digital Sky Survey

(slohn) (SDSS) A survey mapping one-quarter of the entire sky, using a dedicated telescope at the Apache Point Observatory. It will determine the position and magnitude of more than 100 million objects, and measure the distance to more than a million galaxies and quasars.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because many galaxies appear more reddish than blue, most star formation happened long ago, and there are no longer enough new stars emerging to replace the old ones dying off, conclude astronomers Raul Jimenez of the University of Pennsylvania and Alan Heavens and Ben Panter of Edinburgh University, who used spectrum observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.
The Johns Hopkins University Sloan Digital Sky Survey project has been expanding its database catalog to about 300 million celestial objects.
Scientists taking part in an international research project have identified two quasars as the most distant objects ever observed, according to results presented by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) scientists to the American Astronomical Society.
An example is the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Archive Software, produced by the Johns Hopkins University.
The project, carried out by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), was led by NOAO astronomer David Nidever, who is also a research professor of physics at Montana State University.
To solve the cosmic mystery, Sanchez and colleagues analyzed the behavior of as many as 2,000 objects studied as part of two different surveys named Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and QUEST-La chair AGN variability survey.
Wilson studied 282 confirmed and candidate Kepler planets, using spectroscopic measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to reveal each star's iron abundance, a proxy for its total metallicity.
The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and computer simulations to demonstrate that these stellar sprinters originated in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a dwarf galaxy in orbit around the Milky Way.
BOSS, a part of the third Sloan Digital Sky Survey, analyzed about a quarter million galaxies.
But using SN spectra collected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico, which was primarily looking for Type Ia SN, and some of the spectra were taken only two weeks after the SN's explosion.
Dr Boris Gansicke, who led the Sloan Digital Sky Survey team from the universities of Warwick and Kiel, said: "These surface abundances of oxygen imply that these are white dwarfs displaying their bare oxygen-neon cores."