slow-scan television

(redirected from Slow-scan TV)

slow-scan television

[′slō ¦skan ′tel·ə‚vizh·ən]
(communications)
Television system that uses a slow rate of horizontal scanning, requiring typically 8 seconds for each complete scan of the scene; suitable for transmitting printed matter, photographs, and illustrations. Abbreviated SSTV.
References in periodicals archive ?
Slow-scan TV that makes instant consultation possible between medical centers and specialists in their offices or homes.
Slow-scan TV was used to coordinate activities on site at Ellis Island with Paris and with the supervising architect in New York.
Slow-scan TV has been used to observe ship movements in the English channel and the St.
The FAA uses slow-scan TV for weather condition monitoring on the West Coast.
The university has also pioneered in ad hoc long-distance slow-scan TV, allowing students in Hawaii to electronically see and talk to their counterparts in Japan, Taiwan, Korea, and China.
We have secured funds from NHK for IUJ to purchase a slow-scan TV unit, which can be used by any other Japanese educational institutions for possible interaction with American schools.
All of this activity confirms the results of a recent Colorado Video study of over 4,000 communications people which showed these projected increases in users over a previous 1983 study: audiographics use, up 59 percent; slow-scan TV, up 246 percent; compressed digital video, up 431 percent; full-motion video, up 121 percent; and computer graphics, up 171 percent.
A partial list of subjects appropriate to slow-scan TV transmission includes flat copy such as slides, photographs, x-rays, diagrams, layouts, schematics, maps and stamps, and three-dimensional subjects such as people, machinery, products and traffic.
Due to the relatively low data rate, slow-scan TV may also be readily interconnected to digital computers in order to achieve additional functions such as encryption, image enhancement, or storage and retrieval.
Industry estimates are that over 300 slow-scan TV teleconferencing systems were sold in the United States during 1982, probably 10 times the number of digital full-motion systems.