slow-wave sleep


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Related to slow-wave sleep: deep sleep

slow-wave sleep

[′slō ¦wāv ′slēp]
(psychology)
References in periodicals archive ?
During slow-wave sleep, groups of neurons firing at the same time generate brain waves with triple rhythms: slow oscillations, spindles, and ripples.
Because the experiment tested only the first slow-wave sleep session of the nights, the scientists don't know whether the left hemisphere keeps watch all night long.
Galanin, another inhibitory neurotransmitter, is also released; its exact role is unknown, but it is believed to promote NREM sleep, especially slow-wave sleep, and is also involved in wider functions related to learning and memory.
Entering deep slow-wave sleep and then failing to complete the normal sleep cycle can result in a phenomenon known as sleep inertia in which a person feels groggy, disoriented and even sleepier than before napping.
Note that slow-wave sleep expands if you're highly sleep-deprived.
Slow-wave sleep overcomes the person and puts the body in a complete relaxation mode and deep sleep, when both body and brain are totally still.
Heyman says, while others can make it harder to stay asleep, preventing the body from entering the most restful stage of sleep, known as delta or slow-wave sleep.
And by disrupting specific phases of sleep, the research group showed deep or slow-wave sleep was necessary for memory formation.
Moreover, the activity of brain cells during deep sleep, or slow-wave sleep, after learning is critical for such growth.
Earlier sleep tends to be more refreshing as it contains more slow-wave sleep, which is good for repairing your body's defences.
A similar study by Lindberg and colleagues [10] in 2002 found that olanzapine can help maintain normal sleep patterns and increase the length of slow-wave sleep by its antagonistic effect on 5-HT2C receptors.
Sleep is even more crucial for children, who need lots of the rejuvenating, slow-wave sleep known as delta sleep.