Smallness


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Smallness

See also Dwarfism.
Alice
nibbles a magic cake to become a pygmy. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]
Alphonse
petite page to Mr. Wititterly. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
Andorra
small state of 191 square miles, between France and Spain. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 100]
Anon, Mr
. a deformed and hunchbacked midget. [Br. Lit.: Memoirs of a Midget, Magill I, 577–579]
hop-o’-my-thumb
generic term for a midget or dwarf. [Folklore: Brewer Dictionary, 544]
Liechtenstein
central European principality, comprising 65 square miles. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 1578]
Lilliputians
race of pygmies living in fictitious kingdom of Lilliput. [Br. Lit.: Gulliver’s Travels]
Little Tich
midget music-hall comedian of late 1800s. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1082]
Luxembourg
duchy of 999 square miles in Western Europe. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 1632]
Miss M
. perfectly formed midget leads the pleasant social life of a young lady but disappears mysteriously. [Br. Lit.: Walter de la Mare Memoirs of a Midget in Magill I, 577]
Mowcher, Miss
kindhearted hairdresser of small stature. [Br. Lit.: David Copperfield]
Pepin the Short
first Frankish king; progenitor of Carolingian dynasty. [Eur. Hist.: Bishop, 20, 25]
Quilp, Daniel
small man with giant head and face. [Br. Lit.: Old Curiosity Shop]
Rhode Island
smallest of the fifty states; nicknamed “Little Rhodie.” [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2315]
Stareleigh
Justice “a most particularly short man.” [Br. Lit.: Pickwick Papers]
Thumb, Tom
(1838–1883) stage name for the midget, Charles Sherwood Stratton. [Am. Hist.: Benét, 1016]
Thumbelina
tiny girl, rescued by a swallow, marries the tiny king of the Angels of the Flowers. [Dan. Lit.: Andersen’s Fairy Tales]
Zacchaeus
little man took to tree to see Christ. [N.T.: Luke 19:3–4]
References in periodicals archive ?
By pointing out these attitudes of smallness, I do not intend to spare the inefficient and lazy bureaucrats from any responsibility.
In an exclusive interview with the Chinese-language Economic Daily News (EDN), sister publication of Taiwan Economic News (TEN), Ma admitted that in order to facilitate the early signing of the agreement, the early-harvest list, or priority items for tariff cut or market opening, will contain only limited items, according to the principle of "smallness and necessity." It will also follow the principle of mutual benefit in proper proportion, taking into account the sizes of the two markets, according to Ma.
"It demonstrates a smallness of personal disposition and outlook for them to behave in this way."
Taking the form of letters to his agent Kington's book is part view of dealing with terminal cancer part working through the world of writing and publishing and part seeing the world around him as it is in all its smallness and inanity.
It might not be a car to change the world, but the new Ka is better than the old one in every way, and it's a small car that celebrates smallness.
You follow/the smallness your hand once traced--her spine, nape/pressed close.
"The carbon nanotube that is used as the lamp filament is ideal for their purposes because of its smallness and extraordinary temperature stability," he added.
Thus, the diversity in the country profiles that dominate the world investment scene makes it necessary to define the context of smallness, contexts for this may be 'peripheral' countries in integration schemes, transition economies emerging into the global market economy or countries at early stages of development.
The smallness of the troupe left them without the luxury of an understudy.
Co-editors reply: There is very little research into the situation of migrant nurses in New Zealand and we felt it important to report on Shiranthi Fonseka's research in an issue with a focus on diversity, despite the smallness of the study.
"Due to the law of large numbers, traditional IT product models are becoming victims of their own success, while the relative smallness of new approaches facilitates growth much more easily," said Pring.