smallpox vaccine

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smallpox vaccine

[′smȯl‚päks vak‚sēn]
(immunology)
A vaccine prepared from a glycerinated suspension of the exudate from cowpox vesicles obtained from healthy vaccinated calves or sheep. Also known as antismallpox vaccine; glycerinated vaccine virus; Jennerian vaccine; virus vaccinium.
References in periodicals archive ?
VIGIV is the only therapeutic licensed by the FDA for the treatment of complications due to smallpox vaccination and has been stockpiled at a ratio of one dose of VIGIV per 10,000 doses of first or second generation smallpox vaccine.
The 12-month contract is for vaccinia immune globulin intravenous, also known as VIGIV, which is the only medical treatment licensed by theFood and Drug Administration to address complications that may arise from a smallpox vaccination. Under the contract, Emergent BioSolutions will make the treatment, collect plasma for future manufacturing, and do other things maintaining FDA licensure of the treatment.
The 2003 National Smallpox Vaccination Program resulted in the vaccination of almost 40,000 volunteers in 9 months in the United States (2).
The ACIP recommends smallpox vaccination for laboratory personnel who directly handle cultures or animals contaminated or infected with non-highly attenuated VACV (1).
Smallpox vaccination, using the method pioneered by doctor and scientist Edward Jenner, first took place in Berkeley in 1819.
Smallpox vaccination, using the method pioneered by Edward Jenner at Berkeley, first took place in the town in 1819.
The first vaccine for it was discovered by British physician Edward Jenner who discovered the effectiveness of cowpox to protect humans from smallpox in 1796, but the British government didn't introduce compulsory smallpox vaccination until 1853, when it was made an Act of Parliament.
1799: Edward Jenner introduced the smallpox vaccination.
The discontinuation of routine smallpox vaccination in the United States, 1960-1976: an unlikely affirmation of biomedical hegemony
Henderson; members of the former Smallpox Eradication Committee; headquarters and regional WHO staff; statue donors; and individuals who participated on the ground in smallpox vaccination campaigns attended the ceremony.