small

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small

Obsolete (of beer, etc.) of low alcoholic strength

Small

All else being equal, smaller is usually preferable in sustainable building. Larger buildings and spaces require more materials and energy to construct and use more resources to heat, cool, and maintain.

What does it mean when you dream about being small?

If something looks small and distant in a dream, it may be something related to an experience way back in the dreamer’s past. This was an interpretation put forward by Sigmund Freud. (See also Little, Shrink).

SMALL

(1)
Functional, lazy, untyped.

["SMALL - A Small Interactive Functional System", L. Augustsson, TR 28, U Goteborg and Chalmers U, 1986].

SMALL

(2)
A toy language used to illustrate denotational semantics.

["The Denotational Description of Programming Languages", M.J.C. Gordon, Springer 1979].
References in classic literature ?
You are deceiving us, Small," said Athelney Jones, sternly.
This is a very serious matter, Small," said the detective.
Small had dropped his mask of stoicism, and all this came out in a wild whirl of words, while his eyes blazed, and the handcuffs clanked together with the impassioned movement of his hands.
Night after night the whole sky was alight with the burning bungalows, and day after day we had small companies of Europeans passing through our estate with their wives and children, on their way to Agra, where were the nearest troops.
I was selected to take charge during certain hours of the night of a small isolated door upon the southwest side of the building.
A small kindness from those she loved made that timid heart grateful.
Bumble entered the shop; and supporting his cane against the counter, drew forth his large leathern pocket-book: from which he selected a small scrap of paper, which he handed over to Sowerberry.
There were some ragged children in another corner; and in a small recess, opposite the door, there lay upon the ground, something covered with an old blanket.
Having now, sir, parted with it, I wish to make a small observation: not so much because it is anyways necessary, or expresses any new doctrine or discovery, as because it is a comfort to my mind.
On every piece of waste or common ground, some small gambler drove his noisy trade, and bellowed to the idle passersby to stop and try their chance; the crowd grew thicker and more noisy; gilt gingerbread in blanket-stalls exposed its glories to the dust; and often a four-horse carriage, dashing by, obscured all objects in the gritty cloud it raised, and left them, stunned and blinded, far behind.
Just as he left off, the maiden woke up, rubbed her eyes, got off the bank, and had a dance all alone too--such a dance that the savage looked on in ecstasy all the while, and when it was done, plucked from a neighbouring tree some botanical curiosity, resembling a small pickled cabbage, and offered it to the maiden, who at first wouldn't have it, but on the savage shedding tears relented.
Eventually, however, they stumbled upon two small rooms up three pair of stairs, or rather two pair and a ladder, at a tobacconist's shop, on the Common Hard: a dirty street leading down to the dockyard.