Smalltalk-80

Smalltalk-80

(language)
The classic standard Smalltalk dialect, described in Adele's book, cited below, commonly known as "The Blue Book".

["Smalltalk-80: The Language and Its Implementation", Adele Goldberg et al, A-W 1983].

[BYTE 6(8), Aug 1981].

ftp://st.cs.uiuc.edu/pub/ISA, ftp://st.cs.uiuc.edu/pub/Smalltalk/MANCHESTER, ftp://gnu.org/pub/gnu.

Mail server: goodies-lib@r5.cs.man.ac.uk.
References in periodicals archive ?
As illustrated in Figure 1, this interaction model was developed in conjunction with Smalltalk-80 programming language [35].
MVC stems from the Smalltalk language, in Smalltalk-80, the MVC model is to refer to model view pneumatic control model, it including three types of objects: The model provides the business logic, service data and provides the data accessing method; The view is the demonstration of the model on selected screen; The controller is used to handle user command as well as program event, manages interaction that user and view have.
Solo mas tarde, en 1988, MVC se expreso como un concepto general en un articulo sobre Smalltalk-80.
Goldberg, "Smalltalk-80: The Interactive Programming Environment", Addison-Wesley series in computer science.
A Cookbook for Using the Model -View-Controller User Interface Paradigm in Smalltalk-80. Journal of Object- Oriented Programming.
y Robson D., Smalltalk-80 The Language, 1a edicion, pp 581, Editorial Addison Wesley Publishing Co., Palo Alto, California, Estados Unidos, (1989)
This language is a descendent of Smalltalk-80. It relies on an Open-GL graphics engine, which is available for most computing platforms, including Windows, Linux, and Mac.
To illustrate the library approach, we survey examples of libraries for concurrent and for distributed programming in two different well-known object-oriented languages: (1) the Smalltalk-80 programming language and environment, where a basic and simple object concept is uniformly applied to model and structure the whole system through class libraries, including concurrency and distribution aspects; and (2) C++, whose widespread use has resulted in a proliferation of concurrency libraries [Wilson and Liu 1996].
For example in a Smalltalk-80 system, [absolute value of [Theta]] x [absolute value of F] amounts to about 3.5 millions entries.
The slightly subterranean but highly-regarded Smalltalk-80 software environment is for the development of tailor-made applications.
Measurements of early Smalltalk-80 implementations [Krasner 1983] indicate 20% to 70% of runtime spent garbage collecting.
However, two exceptions to this observation are the detailed account by Knuth of using a logbook to document all the errors he encountered over a 10-year development period working on TeX [6] and a logbook of the development efforts of a team implementing the Smalltalk-80 virtual machine [7].