Smike


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Smike

boy deserted and forgotten at Dotheboys Hall. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
References in classic literature ?
'Please, sir, I fell asleep over the fire,' answered Smike, with humility.
After some further conversation between the master and mistress relative to the success of Mr Squeers's trip and the people who had paid, and the people who had made default in payment, a young servant girl brought in a Yorkshire pie and some cold beef, which being set upon the table, the boy Smike appeared with a jug of ale.
'What are you bothering about there, Smike?' cried Mrs Squeers; 'let the things alone, can't you?'
The scene depicted is set at Dotheboys Hall (which Dickens based on an educational establishment near Bowes, County Durham) where young Smike is being beaten by vindictive teacher Wackford Squeers and Nicholas intervenes.
Writing of disabled boys in the fiction of Charles Dickens, Martha Stoddard Holmes notes that while disabled characters may promote growth in others, "there is no 'bildung' for boys like Smike." (66) Hareton Earnshaws own lack of maturity has already been noted; indeed, his infantilization is one of the allusive modes the narrative employs to suggest idiocy.
His transportation was for seven years and it came after he had supported Smike at Dotheboys' Hall for six years.
The big performances around which the smaller characters swarm come from Daniel Weyman, sturdy and upright in the title role, David Yelland equally sturdy and amoral as Ralph, his daughter Hannah Yelland as Kate whose beauty shines with an almost supernatural light in this gloomy London, and David Dawson as the ruined innocent, Smike. And then there is Richard Bremmer as an incredibly - well, Dickensian Newman Noggs.
But the central performances have poise and authority, notably David Yelland as an austere Ralph Nickleby, Zoe Waites as a succession of would-be lovers for Nicholas, and David Dawson who brings sharply timed physical precision to the damaged Smike.
Nicholas, appalled, flees with his favorite student, Smike, and, after many adventures, returns to save his family from the clutches of his horrible uncle.
[14]Arthur Streeton, letter to Nora Streeton, 26 October 1918, in Ann Galbally, Anne Gray (eds), Letters from Smike: the letters of Arthur Streeton 1890-1943 (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1989): 153-54
Croll, ed.,, Smike to Bulldog : Letters from Sir Arthur Streeton to Tom Roberts, Sydney, Ure Smith, 1946, p.
(2: 238) The passage brings to mind Smike in Nicholas Nickleby (1838-39), "vainly endeavouring to master some task which a child of nine years old ...