Smiling


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Smiling

Snobbery (See ARROGANCE, PRETENSION.)
Mona Lisa
(“La Gioconda’) her mysterious smile enchants the beholder. [Ital. Art: Benét 397]
References in periodicals archive ?
Lang's ads have always been delightfully obtuse, quirkily artful - his smiling, dumpy caped crusader (photographed by Juergen Teller) advertised what, capes?
The other danger, of course, is that customers will perceive the constant smiling and too-friendly behavior as insincere.
Smiling when you don't feel like it has been proven to make you feel good by producing actual feelings of happiness.
Fritz Strack of the University of Mannheim, Germany also conducted a study on human smiles, which revealed that people, sometimes unconsciously used the act of smiling to trick their mind into feeling better about a situation.
"Age old adages, such as 'grin and bear it' have suggested smiling to be not only an important nonverbal indicator of happiness but also wishfully promotes smiling as a panacea for life's stressful events," says Kraft.
A smiling person is judged to be more pleasant, attractive, sincere and sociable.
For the participants who made no verbal contact during the observational period, the mean of glances was 7.02 (SD = 3.40) in the smiling condition and 2.01 (SD = 1.91) in the no-smiling control condition.
More smiling can, however, also increase mental and spiritual health.
It is said the English rugby side had to win the World Cup for him to break into a grin.So why the legendarily gruff retired England, British and Irish Lions captain was chosen to be the public face of a charity appeal for photos of people smiling has left many baffled.
Young women drivers recorded the highest smiles-per-hour ratio - smiling on average once every two minutes at the wheel - with drivers aged 66 or more the most stern-faced behind the wheel, likely to crack a smile as few times as six or seven minutes apart.
And while supermodel Kate Moss is used to smiling to the camera, tension in her top lip could be a clue to a faker, claims Martin.
When it comes to smiling, having a missing tooth makes all the difference to Open University lecturer John Hamilton.