Smoke control system

Smoke control system

A system to control the movement of smoke during a fire within a building.
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Professor Dr-Ing Engelbert Lutke Daldrup, CEO of Flughafen Berlin Brandenburg GmbH, said: "The TUV-approved smoke control system marks a milestone in the completion of BER Terminal 1.
"Today, buildings are mainly using a stairwell pressurized only smoke control system, and the other main form would be used for malls or atriums, where you generally have three stories or more open to each other through a common communicating space," says Chris Leaver, Senior Fire Protection Engineer at Summit Fire Consulting in St.
The stairwell pressurization smoke control system is designed to maintain pressure differences in an acceptable range.
Windowless in this context means "one with non-openable windows, windows not readily breakable, or without windows." The IBC continues: "windowless buildings shall be provided with an engineered smoke control system ...
Firstly, while certain buildings were previously exempt, now all high rise buildings over 75 feet will require a smoke control system by increasing protection in stairways in the event of a fire.
Cells also are equipped with individual smoke detectors tied into a master smoke control system. All security-sensitive electronic equipment is located outside maximum-detention zones.
Another danger is that HVAC repair personnel may need to shut down fans for maintenance, but if the building's smoke control system uses those same fans, that system will also be inoperable.
Furthermore, there are other issues that have not been examined thoroughly in these studies and have not been amended in current codes/standards, such as International Building Code (IBC 2015) and Standard for Smoke Control System (NFPA 92 2015), including but not limited to whether the intense airflow of HVLS fans would affect the activation of fire detection systems such as beam/smoke detectors, aggravate smoke/fire spread at early stage of a fire, and hence impose stress on smoke control systems serving the large space.
Although, the focus of this article is on the dampers, the entire smoke control system is required to be periodically tested, and doors and any other fire and smoke protectives must also be tested.
A design fire is a part of a design scenario for the analysis of many types of smoke control systems, and often more than one design scenario is needed for an analysis of a smoke control system.
For buildings where engineered smoke control is required by code, such as high-rise buildings and atria, smoke damper open/closed status indication is required for all dampers that affect the proper operation of the smoke control system. Typically, status is indicated by switches that are physically connected to the damper blade, or auxiliary end-switches from direct-coupled actuators.