snakebite

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snakebite,

wound inflicted by the teeth of a snake. The bite of a nonvenomous snake is rarely serious. Venomous snakes have fangs, hollow teeth through which poison is injected into a victim. All types of snake venom contain a toxin that affects the nerves and tends to paralyze the victim. In addition, the venom of the coral snake, the cobra, and the South American rattlesnake contains constituents that damage blood cells and dissolve the linings of the blood vessels and the lymphatic vessels, causing severe or fatal internal hemorrhage and collapse. First aid for venomous snakebites consists of retarding the spread of the poison through the circulatory system by applying a constricting band or an ice pack, or by spraying ethyl chloride on the wound. It is essential that the patient avoid exertion and the taking of stimulants, as both increase the pulse rate. The constricting band should be applied above the swelling caused by the wound; it should be tight, but not tight enough to stop the pulsing of the blood. If only a few minutes have passed since the infliction of the bite, it is possible to remove much of the poison by suction (see first aidfirst aid,
immediate and temporary treatment of a victim of sudden illness or injury while awaiting the arrival of medical aid. Proper early measures may be instrumental in saving life and ensuring a better and more rapid recovery.
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). Antivenins, which counteract the toxins, are available for most types of snake venom. The two main groups of poisonous snakes in the United States are the coral snakes, which rarely attack humans unless provoked, and the pit vipers (copperhead, cottonmouth moccasin, the various rattlers), which require no provocation.

snakebite

1. a bite inflicted by a snake, esp a venomous one
2. a drink of cider and lager
References in periodicals archive ?
Snake bites are usually occupational hazards in these countries as numerous workers such as fishermen, farmers, plantation workers, and herders come into contact with snakes.
We chose these inclusion criteria so as to be reasonably certain that the series included only Tiger snake bites.
The prevalence and morbidity of snake bite and treatment seeking behaviour among a rural Kenyan population.
As illustrated in Table 2, the majority of practitioners indicated that they would consider treating a range of spider bites, snake bites and insect stings.
That frequently occurs as a result of the large volumes of conventional antivenom that has to be given to cure the victim of the snake bite in question.
68, the great-grandson of Chief Joseph of the Nez perce, regaled the crowd with stories of the 139 snake bites he endured in his work as director of the North Florida Snake Bite Treatment Center.
Most snake bites are not venomous but they can hurt.
Certainly, brown snakes are responsible for most fatal snake bites that are reported.
Investigators in the Arizona rattler country recently reported five cases of poisonous snake bites from apparently dead vipers, two of which were completely decapitated at the time.
Most snake bites are not poisonous, but they can hurt.
a Madison biotechnology company, uses egg antibodies instead of horse serum to make antivenom for snake bites.